Harlem Casino Photos and Premium High Res Pictures - Getty ...

Super interesting racist trial from CPUSA in 1931

[This case of] an expulsion that took place in the US Communist Party in 1931 [gives] us a sense of why expulsion might be valuable and necessary and how its benefits extend from comrade, to party, to the people. In 1931, CPUSA conducted a massive trial in Harlem. August Yokinen, a Finnish worker, was tried for racial prejudice, upholding white superiority, and forwarding views detrimental to the working class. Some 1,500 black and white workers attended the trial, which was held in the Harlem Casino, one of the biggest halls in the area. A jury of fourteen workers, seven black and seven white, delivered the verdict.
The events leading up to Yokinen’s trial unfolded at a Finnish club in Harlem. One evening, three African-American workers showed up for a dance the club was hosting. They were reluctantly admitted, but the hostility of some of the white workers was such that the black workers soon felt they had leave. Yokinen was one of several party members at the dance, none of whom defended the black workers, meaning that none fulfilled “their responsibilities and duties as Party members.” The white party members neglected to take “a decisive stand for the defense of the right of the Negro workers to attend this dance together with the white workers.” They failed to put equal rights in practice. Instead, they tried to smooth things over.
The Communist Party Committee of the Harlem section investigated the matter, questioning “the comrades in the Finnish club.”9 The Finnish comrades “admitted their mistake … all except Comrade Yokinen.” Yokinen attempted to justify his behavior by saying that he was worried that the black workers would go into the pool room, a room for bathing, “and that he for one, did not wish to bathe with Negroes.”
At Yokinen’s trial, Clarence Hathaway, the editor of the Daily Worker, presented the case for prosecution. Richard B. Moore, “the Party’s greatest black orator,” carried the defense. Each of their speeches detailed for the audience the Communist Party’s position that the struggle for black freedom and racial equality was central to working class struggle. Each emphasized the party’s commitment to eliminating white chauvinism from its ranks. Each agreed that Yokinen was guilty. The defense produced a statement from him (translated from Finnish; Yokinen was not fluent in English) that admitted guilt and promised to rectify it through concrete work toward eliminating race prejudice and supporting the black liberation struggle. The disagreement between the prosecution and the defense was over the penalty: should Yokinen be expelled from the Communist Party or put on probation?
Hathaway’s case for expulsion focused on how Yokinen was guilty of views and practices that hindered class unity and violated fundamental laws of the Communist Party. Yokinen hindered class unity in several ways. First, the prosecutor claimed that the accused repeated the “white-superiority lies that have been developed consciously by the capitalists and the Southern slave-owners.” Hathaway was acknowledging that Yokinen hadn’t come up with his prejudicial views on his own but repeated ideas he got from others. These ideas were “systematically and persistently implanted among the workers of this country by the capitalists.” Yokinen thus operated as a “phonograph for the capitalists.” Hathaway explained to the jury and audience that capitalists promoted white superiority in order to justify the “brutal exploitation and the vicious persecution of the Negro masses by the capitalists in the United States.” Therefore even the slightest expression of race superiority turned white workers into “the agents of the bourgeoisie inside the working class movement.” By transmitting racist views instead of acting according to the egalitarian expectations of the Communist Party, Yokinen undermined party efforts to build unity among black and white workers.
Hathaway’s second argument was that Yokinen indirectly supported the double oppression of black workers. Hathaway reminded those present at the trial that the ideology of white superiority and race hatred was the foundation for lynching and Jim Crow. He told the assembled workers:
Comrade Yokinen, of course, is against all this. He is against lynching and persecution. But unconsciously, Comrade Yokinen with his theories weakens all the efforts to bring about the unity between the white and Negro workers in common struggle against the ruthless and bloody exploiters.
To bring home the seriousness of Yokinen’s crime, Hathaway noted that forty-three “Negro workers and poor farmers were lynched last year.” He linked these crimes to black courage and militancy, saying that Southern whites typically presented lynching as a response to the charge of rape but that this was a lie. Hathaway explained:
When you go to the root of these “rape” cases, we find not rape but that the Negro is lynched because he refuses to accept the accounting that he is given by the landlord’s store. They refuse to be enslaved by the landowners, and it is principally for these reasons that 43 lynchings took place last year.
In the context of lynching and Jim Crow, Yokinen’s failure to welcome and support black workers in practice put him on the side of the lynchers and landlords. Instead of advancing the courageous struggle of black workers and farmers, the defendant’s actions hindered it. His white chauvinism made the development of class unity impossible, thereby strengthening “the enemies of the workers—capitalists and landlords.” The position of the Communist Party, though, was that white supremacy had to be “categorically condemned as anti-working class.” Yokinen failed to uphold this position; hence, he must be expelled.
Hathaway’s third argument was that Yokinen, whom he referred to throughout the trial as “Comrade Yokinen,” violated the views of the party. The prosecution repeatedly asserted the Communist Party’s commitment to “complete and unconditional equality for the Negroes.” This meant the abolition of laws and practices, laws discriminating against black people in employment, housing, and voting; laws prohibiting interracial marriage; and the broader array of social practices—like dancing and bathing at the Finnish Club—that inscribed racial hierarchy. Mark Naison emphasizes the “landmark” quality of the party’s approach to race relations: “Never before had a political movement, socialist or otherwise, tried to create an interracial community that extended into [the] personal sphere, and defined participation in this community as a political duty.” Comradeship had to impact everyday life. To draw out how committed the Communist Party was to complete and unconditional racial equality, Hathaway told the story of Comrade Dunne, a party organizer who had recently given a speech in the South. The organizer was asked whether he would ever want his sister “to marry a n----r.” Comrade Dunne replied that “he would sooner have his sister marry a militant, fighting Negro, determined to secure equality, than any yellow-bellied white chauvinist.” The audience applauded. When Yokinen failed to uphold the party’s commitment to racial equality in action, Hathaway observed, he gave black workers good reason to expect nothing but betrayal.
As a contrast to Yokinen’s actions, Hathaway explained the Communist Party’s commitment to black people’s self-determination in the Black Belt. He made clear to the audience of black and white workers the difference between the Communist Party line and the Garveyite position that African Americans should return to Africa:
We say that the Negro masses have helped to build this country, to establish its institutions and to create its wealth. These Negro masses today are just as much American as any one of us here. They have a right to live in this country on terms of complete freedom.
Because African Americans worked the fields that created the wealth of the US South, that land rightly belonged to them. Thus, the Communist Party was fighting to take that land away from the Southern landowners and give it to the sharecroppers and tenant farmers.
Hathaway concluded by reiterating that it was the duty of white workers to defeat lynching and “unhesitatingly jump at the throat of any person who strikes a Negro in the face, who persecutes a Negro.” Because the struggle for the equal rights of black people was so crucial to the proletarian struggle, the Communist Party had to prove in action that it was committed to wiping out every trace of white chauvinism. It had to demonstrate its commitment by expelling Yokinen from the party. Nevertheless, Hathaway offered Yokinen a path back to the party. If Yokinen fought actively against white supremacy, selling the black newspaper The Liberator and reporting on his trial at the Finnish Workers Club, then he should be able to apply for readmission.
Moore’s defense focused on working-class justice: the principle that should decide Yokinen’s punishment entailed insuring “the development of the struggle of the working class and the unity of all the oppressed toilers.” Reminding the jury that Yokinen had come to admit his guilt, Moore announced: “But it is not Comrade Yokinen alone who is on trial here. No, fellow-workers, the vicious capitalist system which exploits all the workers, this vile, corrupt, oppressive system is the chief criminal in this working class trial.” The landlords and bourgeoisie are the ones who spread the poison of race hatred—aided by union and socialist opportunists. Moore’s point was not that Yokinen should not be held accountable. It was that no one was innocent. Every aspect of capitalist imperialism spreads the corrupt ideology of white superiority. Moore even turned his critique back on the Communist Party, asking whether it had done the requisite educational work to confront race hatred. Had it developed programs for the workers’ movement explaining the importance of the struggle against lynching? Had it made a serious effort to root out prejudice? Moore declared that the answer was no. The party shared in Yokinen’s crime. Expelling Comrade Yokinen would not remove the “taint of chauvinism” from the party or liberate the party from its prejudice. Moore thus concluded that self-criticism, not expulsion, was the better way. Self-criticism would enable the party to prove its commitment through its deeds and “actually work and fight side by side with the doubly oppressed Negro masses, against the bosses’ Jim-Crow lynch system, for full equality and self-determination.” An added benefit, Moore argued, was that self-criticism would save Yokinen for the struggle, a crucial factor when every worker needed to be brought in to the effort to bring the system down.
Moore emphasized the seriousness of expulsion:
We must remember that a verdict of expulsion in disgrace from the Communist Party is considered by a class-conscious worker as worse than death at the hands of the bourgeois oppressors. As for myself, I would rather have my head severed from my body by the capitalist lynchers than to be expelled from the Communist International.
Being cut off from the party, separated from one’s comrades and deprived of their comradeship, is a fate worse than death. It is the kind of social death where a worker becomes an outsider to his own movement, a person as bad as or worse than the capitalists themselves. Moore painted a vivid picture of the global struggle of the working class against imperialism. He linked the “terror and suffering and misery of the Negro workers” to that of Russian workers and peasants, to oppressed workers in Finland, to the Chinese workers butchered by the Kuomintang, to colonized workers in India, and to all the masses oppressed by the British social-fascist imperialist government in Africa and other colonies. Were Comrade Yokinen to be expelled, he would be lost, worldless, alone.
Moore concluded that Yokinen should be condemned, but argued that “we must first and foremost condemn the bloody, brutal, vicious system of capitalism which breeds unemployment and wage cuts, which breeds starvation and misery, which breeds lynching and terror, which breeds racial and nationalist prejudice.” The party should save and educate its comrade, putting him on probation and giving him a chance to prove that he could fight “for the unity of the working class.” It should also engage in ruthless struggle against white chauvinism and anything else that threatened class unity.
The jury found Yokinen guilty, which was not surprising since he had already admitted his guilt. They agreed to expel him but were split on whether the expulsion should last for six or twelve months. They accepted the prosecution’s suggestions for the ways Yokinen could correct his mistakes: by reporting on his trial at the Finnish Club, by fighting to have the club admit black workers, by “actively participat[ing] in the struggle against white chauvinism throughout Harlem,” by joining the League of Struggle for Negro rights and selling The Liberator, and by taking a leading role in the struggle against white chauvinism in every organization to which he belonged. Even though Yokinen was expelled, he remained a comrade. The trial resulted in a decision that affirmed his role in the class struggle, a role focused on eliminating white chauvinism. The party didn’t cut him off. They provided him with a path back.
The day after the trial, Yokinen was arrested and held for deportation. The Daily Worker explained that the bourgeoisie had expected him to become a rat after being expelled from the party. Instead, Yokinen committed himself to fighting for race equality and working-class solidarity. Imploring readers to defend Comrade Yokinen, the newspaper declared:
Just as the Negroes are lynched and burned at the stake here, so the revolutionary workers are murdered there. And Comrade Yokinen, who Sunday prepared himself to take up the fight against the lynchers here, is to be sent to the Finnish butchers there.
In retrospect, it could seem like the Daily Worker was indulging in rhetorical flourish for the sake of furthering the party line on the centrality of the struggle against white supremacy to the proletarian struggle. A year and half after the initial arrest, however, the paper quoted the US Court of Appeals, which had upheld the deportation order. Noting Yokinen’s expulsion, the court argued that “it is enough that the alien Yokinen pledged himself to perform certain tasks prescribed by the Communist Party to secure reinstatement. On this ground the relator is deportable.” This confirms that Yokinen was in fact being deported because of his agreement to follow the Communist Party line and devote himself to the struggle for black liberation. The paper quoted Yokinen: “A Communist must be true to his Party and carry out its principles not only in words but in deeds. I have carried out these principles. I would rather be deported than be false to them and lose the trust of my comrades.”
The story of August Yokinen is not exactly a story of the end of comradeship. Even though he was expelled from the party, the party did not deprive him of comradeship. On the contrary, the Comintern-backed International Labor Defense (ILD) defended him during his deportation hearings. Yokinen was expelled, but not forever banished. Expulsion was an end but it wasn’t complete or final; it was a moment. This gives us a view of the end of comradeship that Harry Haywood associates with rectification. Comrades will make mistakes, mistakes that will violate party principles and damage the proletarian struggle, mistakes that must be condemned. But that does not have to mean that they must be cut off forever. Workers’ justice and communist principle require that comrades be given a chance to return.
________________________________________________
Excerpt from: Jodi Dean - Comrade (2019)
submitted by Antifa_LEAKS to communism [link] [comments]

From casino to Malcolm X: The history of Harlem’s Malcolm Shabazz Mosque

From casino to Malcolm X: The history of Harlem’s Malcolm Shabazz Mosque submitted by IK-o to nyc [link] [comments]

My Top 10 bond films

My order probably changes weekly, but most of the films on this list stay within the top 10 for me. I’m early 30s and have been watching bond films since probably around 5. My aunt introduced me to the films. The series had a resurgence with Brosnan and was pretty popular when I was a kid (and is still going strong I might add!). I still love watching the movies as an adult, I even like the ones considered awful.
•Thunderball•
+Connery’s best performance +Sexiest collective of Bond Girls 🔥 +Beautiful setting/time period and arguably best cinematography.
•The Spy Who Loved Me•
+Moore’s best performance +Jaws! +Barbara Bach 🔥
•Goldeneye•
+Excellent Pacing +Best Introduction to a new bond. This film oozes style! +Xenia Onatopp 🔥
•On Her Majesty’s Secret Service•
+The germ warfare plotline +Diana Rigg 🔥 best bond girl ever? +Bond gets married.
•Live and Let Die•
+The settings. Harlem, Louisiana, San Monique. +Baron Samedi and the voodoo aspects. +Solitare 🤤
•Goldfinger•
+Auric Goldfinger, Oddjob +Interesting villain plot +Pussy Galore and her redemption. Powerful strong female character.
•The World Is Not Enough•
+Brosnan best performance +Electra King is smokin hot 🔥 Only time where main villain is a woman. +Last great Bond film that followed the classic formula.
•Dr No•
+Coolest introduction of any character of all time ever. +Honey Ryder 🔥 +Felt like more of a spy thriller than any of the others.
•The Man With The Golden Gun•
+Fun fantasy plot +Arguably some of the best villains of the series +Maude Adams 🔥
• Casino Royale•
+I love whenever Bond plays cards and it’s a focal point of this film. +Most Emotionally deep bond film of all. +Excellent supporting cast in this film
submitted by RentSpirited to JamesBond [link] [comments]

A preservation battle is brewing over Harlem's historic Renaissance Ballroom & Casino

A preservation battle is brewing over Harlem's historic Renaissance Ballroom & Casino submitted by zsreport to nycHistory [link] [comments]

Vegas Style Harlem Shake at the D Casino (Downtown). This sh#t is hilarious!

Vegas Style Harlem Shake at the D Casino (Downtown). This sh#t is hilarious! submitted by AngelicaiPartyVegas to vegas [link] [comments]

One Piece 960 Spoilers

One Piece chapter 960 Title : " Kozuki Oden appears "
From the korean site spoiler :
On the image where the guy is talking to Sukiyaki, he is explaining about Oden when he was a kid:
More Spoilers:

More translation

Oden: Well then, see you! Katsuzo!!! (Oden's dead friend? the pile of bones?) Next time we drink it'd be in the other world!
Oden: Well then, relatives, I'd be taking my leave (this isn't the exact translation but rather how I perceived it)
Dude chasing after Oden: My apologies! He's a man of few words.

--The Kin'emon and Otsuro part--
Tsuru: Kin'emon!!! You stole from my wallet again didn't you!
Kin'emon: It hurrtts!!!! stop it already Tsuru! We been friends since we were lil twerps haven't we?
Kin'emon: My older bro has been a bit pressed for cash as of late you see... panicking
Tsuru: What older bro?! You gamble that's why you're always broke. Do you even know how much your tab is?!!!
Tsuru: If you lay as much as a finger on my money again, I'm selling your kidneys

Spoiler Image 01 : Kozuki Oden's appearance
Spoiler Image 02 : Kozuki Sukiyaki
Spoiler Image 03 : The young scabbard Denjiro
Spoiler Image 04 : Young punk Kin'emon
Spoiler Image 05 : A young beauty of O-tsuro
Spoiler Image 06 : Closer look of Kozuki Oden
Spoiler Image 07 : Young Denjiro with his sunglasses
Spoiler Image 08 : The Wano country in the past
Spoiler Image 09 : Kin'emon vs O-tsuro
Spoiler Image 10 : Oden causing havoc
Spoiler Image 11 : Kozuki Oden eating and drinking (HQ)
More to come. I will keep you updated.
submitted by brikskohuh to OnePiece [link] [comments]

Persona 5's Plot is based on Steely Dan's 1972 Album, 'Can't Buy A Thrill'

Ok so, from reading the title, I know this must seem just totally batshit. But bear with me, I swear there's a connection here. All of the major Story Beats in Persona 5 can be linked to at least one song on Steely Dan's seminal 1972 album, Can't Buy A Thrill.
So, where to begin - the beginning seems like a good enough place, both of the album and the story. Our protagonist's journey begins with his false imprisonment on an assault charge after protecting a woman from a powerful politician's drunken advances, and this beginning of the plot is echoed in the first verse of the first song on the album, 'Do It Again' - The lyrics go as follows:
'In the mornin' you go gunning for the man who stole your wate
And you fire till he is done in but they catch you at the borde
And the mourners are all singin' as they drag you by your feet/
But the hangman isn't hangin' and they put you on the street.'
The 'morning' here refers to the figurative morning of the story, at its beginning. The man who stole your water is Shido - not in a literal sense, but rather that he has massively affected your life. The lyric 'you fire till he is done in but they catch you at the border' refers to the Protagonist's victory over Shido in the short-term, and subsequent imprisonment. The 'mourners' are the life that the Protagonist leaves behind after his assault charge, and his being 'put on the street' is in reference to how he is turned away and forced to live in Tokyo.
Onto the next verse:
When you know she's no high climber, then you find your only friend/
In a room with your two timer, and you're sure you're near the end/
Then you love a little wild one, and she brings you only sorrow/
All the time you know she's smilin', you'll be on your knees tomorrow'
This could be interpreted to be about the early days at Shujin - The first line could be in reference to the cutscene where the protagonist and Ann first meet - that the protagonist knows she's 'no high climber' because of her kindness toward him, and then you 'find your only friend' immediately after in the form of Ryuji, who disregards all the rumours about you. 'In a room with your two timer' could, fittingly enough have multiple meanings - the 'two timer' could be Kamoshida, with his double identity between himself and his shadow, or it could be Ann, who is falsely perceived by the students to be 'two timing' Kamoshida. The 'wild one' mentioned in the next line could also be Ann, due to her costume and namesake, as Panther. Finally, the last line 'All the time you know she's smilin' references Ann's new hope after joining the Phantom thieves, and the lyric 'You'll be on your knees tomorrow' references Kamoshida's shadow after its defeat, as he sinks to his knees.
So, what's next? Well, we will come back to this song later, but for now, the plot moves along to the next song on the album, 'Dirty Work', and how it references Madarame's Arc. The song begins
'Times are hard, you're afraid to pay the fee/
so you find yourself somebody, who can do the job for free'
These introductory lyrics align closely with Madarame and Yusuke's story - the hard times Madarame falls upon are his art block, and he is 'afraid to pay the fee' of suffering for his lack of productivity, so he finds himself somebody 'who can do the job for free' - his many apprentices, whose artwork he steals. The chorus, in turn, exemplifies Yusuke's part of the story after his awakening:
'I'm a fool to do your dirty work, oh yeah/
I don't wanna do your dirty work, no more'
Yusuke realises Madarame's complicity and no longer wishes to work under him. Indeed, the line in the second verse
'I foresee terrible trouble, and I stay here just the same'
could show Yusuke's mindset - he subconsciously knows something is wrong, but continues to labour under Madarame.
Next is Kaneshiro's Palace, and a few songs on the album go with this. However, I'd argue the two most poignant are 'Brooklyn Owes The Charmer Under Me' and 'Midnite Cruiser', both of which deal with similar themes. Brooklyn Owes..., specifically uses these themes of luxury, as with the themes of Kaneshiro's palace. Check out these lyrics:
'A race of angels bound to one anothe
a dish of dollars laid out for all to see'
The angels specifically here could reference the shadows, who are themselves bound, and the dish of dollars carries with it themes of luxury, as well as echoing Kaneshiro's desire to be seen as wealthy and powerful. However, his true nature is succinctly expressed in 'Midnite Cruiser', in the lyrics:
'Tell me where are you driving, Midnite Cruiser?/
Where is your bounty of fortune and fame/
I am another gentleman lose
drive me to Harlem, or somewhere the same.'
In this chorus, one can see a reflection of Kaneshiro's true nature - his desire for 'fortune and fame' and his status as a 'Gentleman loser' show that he has already tacitly accepted his failure, and in turn highlights the vanity of his efforts in the real world. Finally, in 'Brooklyn owes...', the lyric
'A case of aces done up loose for dealing' echoes the nature of Kaneshiro's treasure, the briefcase full of fake cash - the ace itself symbolically implies value, but the fact that there is a case thereof significantly diminishes this, and shows the phony nature of Kaneshiro's wealth.
Next is Futaba, and with her palace, the song 'Fire In The Hole', which rather aptly summarises the nature of her tragedy. The first verse is as follows:
' I decline to walk the line They tell me that I'm lazy Worldly wise, I realize That everybody's crazy A woman's voice reminds me To serve and not to speak, am I myself or just another freak?'
The consistent reference to a 'they' in these lines points to a feeling of alienation from the outside world, and the specific problems mentioned, of being lazy or crazy, could easily match up with one's perceptions of what they think the people around them think of their faults. All of this corresponds to Futaba hiding herself away in her room. The 'woman's voice' would be her hallucinations of Wakaba disparaging her, and the questioning of her own identity or if she's 'just another freak' denote her feelings of low self esteem. The next verse contains the lyrics
'My life is boiling ove
it's happened once before/
I wish someone would open up the door'
which pretty aptly summarise Futaba's situation - her increased feelings of stress ('life is boiling over') and her wish that someone would 'open up the door' showing a nascent desire to no longer sequester herself - this could be the catalyst for her demand of the Phantom Thieves to change her heart.
Next is Okumura's palace, which I feel embodies best the song 'Only A Fool Would Say That'. Right from the outset, the disparaging title makes it clear that the person who would say this is prideful. Okumura's greed takes on a corporate façade of colourful advertising, but behind the curtain it is incredibly harmful. This song describes the downtrodden condition of the worker:
'The man in the street, dragging his feet/
don't wanna hear the bad news.'
as well as how the narrator, who we already know is prideful, declares that only a fool would believe in better things:
'I heard it was you/
talkin' 'bout a world where all is free/
it just couldn't be/
and only a fool would say that'
This shows the greed of taking advantage of the workers in this way, and the hypocrisy of Okumura in the diametrically opposed views of Okumura Foods that the public gets - the cheerful, outward facing façade, complete with space theming, and the horrific reality of being consistently beaten down and overworked, all the while being told that better things aren't possible.
Next is Sae's palace, which corresponds to the final verse of 'Do It Again' - in this way we can see the recursive nature of the plot, taking us back to the beginning of the album and the story through the flashbacks to Sae. This recursive nature is emphasised by the line in the bridge:
'You go back, Jack, do it again/
wheel turnin' round and round'
The final verse goes as follows:
'Now you swear and kick and beg us that you're not a gambling man/
then you find you're back in Vegas with a handle in your hand/
Your black cards can make you money, so you hide them when you're able/
in the land of milk and honey, you must put them on the table'
This verse is especially interesting to me - the casino theming is obvious, but it also denotes the Thieves' character arcs in a poignant manner. The first line deals with misconceptions, a theme for most characters in the story - each of them is misinterpreted or seen as something they're not, usually by the forces of the law or the establishment. However, this same alienation drives them to actually become the thieves that society has t out for the most - that they 'find (they're) back in Vegas' shows that they have taken in society's misconceptions and reclaimed them as their own. This makes sense in the context of the story, as the Phantom Thieves' full team has assembled, and they are striking back against the most distilled representation of the establishment thus far - Sae Niijima, a corrupt prosecutor who has been seen. up until this point, in a negative light. The hiding of the black cards represents striking back at an unjust system - if you cheat in a Casino, you're already winning against a heavily weighted house. It could also represent the deception of Akechi surrounding Joker, their ace in the hole - in the context of this line the cards would be hidden from the dealer, and as such this implies that Akechi is on the side of the house, the dealer, and the corrupt adults. The 'land of milk and honey' is what is promised for those who follow the rules, and shows Akechi's deception of the thieves - both parties end up putting their cards on the table, and it is only thanks to the Thieves' plotting that they end up beating the house, so to speak.
Finally, Shido's Palace is best suited to the song 'Kings', unsurprisingly. The song itself details the American political climate during the Vietnam War, but also acts as an effective allegory for Shido's nationalistic political aspirations. The song is from the point of view of an apathetic citizenry, in keeping with the story, and shows the tyrannical nature of being ruled, as well as the suffering of everyday people, comparing these world leaders to the Kings of old, carrying out vast campaigns while their subjects suffered. Here is the chorus:
We seen the last of Good King Richard/
Ring out the past, his name lives on, and on/
Roll out the bones, and raise up your pitche
Raise your glass for Good King John'.
The specific reference to Kings Richard and John is interesting, as they are two characters who are especially major contextually in the story of, you guessed it, Robin Hood. The same Robin Hood that Akechi's persona is based on. The song admits that:
'While he plundered far and wide/
all his starving children cried'
- this could be in reference to Akechi's tragic upbringing, or more figuratively the fate of the nation when policy is abandoned for nationalistic glory seeking. This is further exemplified in the lines
'And though we sung his fame/
we went hungry just the same.'
which reinforces this idea. The apathy of the citizenry also carries this over to the final major plot beat (excluding Royal's events, which I will leave out cause my arms are getting tired) - Yaldabaoth, and his control over the people. The overthrow of the king, both in the stealing of Shido's heart and the killing of Yaldabaoth, show the determination of the phantom thieves against the apathetic nature of the populace, and shows that the will to change society can accomplish much.
Anyway, in conclusion, listen to more Steely Dan, and play more Persona.
submitted by Qaztacho to Persona5 [link] [comments]

Turner Classic Movies (U.S.) Schedule For The Month Of September, 2020 (All Airtimes E.S.T)

Tuesday, September 01, 2020
(1:15 AM) (drama) L'Eclisse (1962/126 m/Michelangelo Antonioni)
(3:30 AM) (western) Lost Command (1966/129 m/Mark Robson)
(6:00 AM) (suspense) The 39 Steps (1935/87 m/Alfred Hitchcock)
(7:45 AM) (suspense) The Lady Vanishes (1938/96 m/Alfred Hitchcock)
(9:30 AM) (suspense) Foreign Correspondent (1940/121 m/Alfred Hitchcock)
(11:45 AM) (suspence) Suspicion (1941/99 m/Alfred Hitchcock)
(1:27 PM) (short) Men In Fright (1938/11 m/George Sidney)
(1:45 PM) (suspense) Stage Fright (1950/110 m/Alfred Hitchcock)
(3:45 PM) (suspense) Dial ‘M’ For Murder (1954/105 m/Alfred Hitchcock)
(5:32 PM) (short) Third Dimensional Murder (1941/7 m/George Sidney)
(5:45 PM) (suspense) The Wrong Man (1956/105 m/Alfred Hitchcock)
(7:34 PM) (short) Wrong Way Butch (1950/10 m/David Barclay)
(8:00 PM) (premiere) Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (episode 1) (2019/60 m/Mark Cousins)
(10:45 PM) (documentary) Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (episode 1) (2019/60 m/Mark Cousins)
Wednesday, September 02, 2020
(12:00 AM) (premiere) Olivia (1951/96 m/
(1:45 AM) (premiere) Sleepwalking Land (2008/96 m/Teresa Prata)
(3:30 AM) (premiere) Seven Beauties (1975/117 m/Lina Wertmuller)
(5:30 AM) (premiere) Je tu il Elle (1975/86 m/Chantal Akerman)
(6:57 AM) (short) Over The Counter (1932/18 m/Jack Cummings)
(7:15 AM) (premiere) Madchen In Uniform (1931/89 m/Leontine Sagan)
(9:00 AM) (comedy) La Cienaga (2001/101 m/Lucrecia Martel)
(11:00 AM) (musical) Yolanda and the Thief (1945/108 m/Vincente Minnelli)
(1:00 PM) (musical) Call of the Flesh (1930/100 m/Charles Brabin)
(2:45 PM) (musical) Fiesta (1947/102 m/Richard Thorpe)
(4:30 PM) (musical) Pan-Americana (1945/84 m/John H. Auer)
(6:00 PM) (romance) Latin Lovers (1953/104 m/Mervyn Le Roy)
(8:00 PM) (musical) Sweet Charity (1969/148 m/Bob Fosse)
(10:45) (drama) All That Jazz (1979)
Thursday, September 03, 2020
(1:00 AM) (musical) Cabaret (1972/124 m/Bob Fosse)
(3:15 AM) (premiere) Star ‘80 (1983/103 m/Bob Fosse)
(5:15 AM) (documentary) A Well Spent Life (1971/44 m/Les Blank)
(6:00 AM) (suspense) The Window (1949/73 m/Ted Tetzlaff)
(7:15 AM) (comedy) Having Wonderful Time (1938/70 m/Alfred Santell)
(9:30 AM) (drama) Picnic At Hanging Rock (1975/107 m/Peter Weir)
(10:30 AM) (adventure) Corvette Summer (1978/105 m/Matthew Robbins)
(12:15 PM) (romance) A Stolen Life (1946/107 m/Curtis Bernhardt)
(2:15 PM) (drama) The Southerner (1945/93 m/Jean Renoir)
(4:00 PM) (comedy) The Seven Year Itch (1955/104 m/Billy Wilder)
(5:49 PM) (short) Mackinac Island (1944/9 m/James A. FitzPatrick)
(6:00 PM) (romance) Summer of ‘42 (1971/104 m/Robert Mulligan)
(9:00 PM) (drama) The Story of Louis Pasteur (1936/86 m/William Dieterle)
(9:45 PM) (drama) The Story of Dr. Jenner (1939/10 m/Henry K. Dunn)
(10:00 PM) (drama) Sister Kenny (1946/116 m/Dudley Nichols)
Friday, September 04, 2020
(12:01 AM) (short) See Your Doctor (1939/8 m/Basil Wrangell)
(12:15 AM) (drama) Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet (1940/103 m/William Dieterle)
(2:15 AM) (drama) Arrowsmith (1931/99 m/John Ford)
(4:15 AM) (adventure) Yellow Jack (1938/83 m/George B. Seitz)
(5:47 AM) (short) Her Honor, The Nurse (1956/8 m/Harry W. Smith)
(6:00 AM) (drama) Madame Curie (1943/124 m/Mervyn Le Roy)
(9:15 AM) (documentary) Hollywood: The Dream Factory (1972/51 m/Mark Woods)
(9:30 AM) (comedy) Some Like It Hot (1959/122 m/Billy Wilder)
(11:45 AM) (comedy) The Apartment (1960/125 m/Billy Wilder)
(2:00 PM) (comedy) The Prisoner of Second Avenue (1974/98 m/Melvin Frank)
(4:00 PM) (comedy) The Sunshine Boys (1975/111 m/Herbert Ross)
(6:00 PM) (comedy) The Goodbye Girl (1977/111 m/Herbert Ross)
(8:00 PM) (premiere) The T.A.M.I. Show (1964/113 m/Steve Binder)
(10:15 PM) (documentary) Let The Good Times Roll (1973/99 m/Sidney Levin)
Saturday, September 05, 2020
(12:00 AM) (documentary) Elvis: That’s The Way It Is (1970/95 m/Denis Sanders)
(1:45 AM) (documentary) Divine Madness (1980/94 m/Michael Ritchie)
(3:30 AM) (documentary) ABBA: The Movie (1977/97 m/Lasse Hallstrom)
(5:30 AM) (documentary) MGM Parade Show #4 (1955/26 m/?)
(6:00 AM) (crime) The Biggest Bundle Of Them All (1968/108 m/Ken Annakin)
(9:00 AM) (premiere) MGM CARTOONS: The Chump Champ (1950/7 m/Fred [Tex] Avery)
(9:09 AM) (documentary) Game Warden (1955/8 m/Harry W. Smith)
(9:18 AM) (short) Seattle: Gateway To The Northwest (1940/9 m/?)
(9:28 AM) (drama) Isle Of Fury (1936/60 m/Frank McDonald)
(9:30 AM) (serial) TERRY AND THE PIRATES: The Fatal Mistake (1940/17 m/?)
(10:00 AM) (premiere) POPEYE: Fleets of Stren'th (1942/7 m/Dave Fleischer)
(10:08 AM) (adventure) Elephant Stampede (1951/71 m/Ford Beebe)
(11:30 AM) (short) Frontier Days (1945/17 m/Jack Scholl)
(12:00 PM) (suspense) The Prize (1963/135 m/Mark Robson)
(2:30 PM) (western) Stagecoach (1939/96 m/John Ford)
(4:15 PM) (drama) East Of Eden (1955/118 m/Elia Kazan)
(6:30 PM) (comedy) Bananas (1971/82 m/Woody Allen)
(8:00 PM) (documentary) The Kids Are Alright (1979/109 m/Jeff Stein)
(10:00 PM) (premiere) Shine A Light (2008/122 m/Martin Scorsese)
Sunday, September 06, 2020
(12:15 AM) (documentary) The Decline of Western Civilization (1981/100 m/Penelope Spheeris)
(2:15 AM) (documentary) The Decline of Western Civilization, Part II: The Metal Years (1988/93 m/Penelope Spheeris)
(4:00 AM) (documentary) This Is Elvis (1981/102 m/Malcolm Leo)
(6:00 AM) (musical) On An Island With You (1948/108 m/Richard Thorpe)
(9:00 AM) (musical) Easy To Love (1953/96 m/Charles Walters)
(10:00 AM) (crime) Night Editor (1946/67 m/Henry Levin)
(12:00 PM) (romance) The Enchanted Cottage (1945/92 m/John Cromwell)
(1:45 PM) (drama) The V.I.P.s (1963/119 m/Anthony Asquith)
(4:00 PM) (romance) Crossing Delancey (1988/97 m/Joan Micklin Silver)
(6:00 PM) (romance) To Have and Have Not (1944/100 m/Howard Hawks)
(8:00 PM) (documentary) The Song Remains The Same (1976/138 m/Peter Clifton)
(10:30 PM) (documentary) Jimi Hendrix (1973/102 m/Joe Boyd)
Monday, September 07, 2020
(12:15 AM) (premiere) Jimi Plays Monterey (1986/49 m/D.A. Pennebaker)
(1:15 AM) (premiere) Shake!: Otis At Monterey (1987/19 m/D.A. Pennebaker)
(1:45 AM) (premiere) Fade To Black (2004/110 m/Patrick Paulson)
(5:30 AM) (premiere) Say Amen, Somebody: The Good News Musical (1982/101 m/George T. Nierenberg)
(7:15 AM) (premiere) A Poem Is A Naked Person (1977/90 m/Les Blank)
(9:00 AM) (premiere) Louie Bluie (1985/61 m/Terry Zwigoff)
(12:15 PM) (premiere) Big Time (1988/87 m/Chris Blum)
(2:00 PM) (documentary) Don’t Look Back (1967/96 m/D.A. Pennebaker)
(4:00 PM) (premiere) Neil Young: Heart Of Gold (2006/104 m/Jonathan Demme)
(6:00 PM) (premiere) Festival (1967/98 m/Murray Lerner)
(8:00 PM) (documentary) Monterey Pop (1969/79/D.A. Pennebaker)
(9:30 PM) (documentary) Woodstock: The Director’s Cut (1970/224 m/Michael Wadleigh)
Tuesday, September 08, 2020
(1:30 AM) (musical) A Hard Day’s Night (1964/87 m/Richard Lester)
(3:15 AM) (documentary) Go Go Mania (1965/70 m/Frederic Goode)
(4:45 AM) (documentary) Robert Osborne’s 20th Anniversary Tribute (2015/47 m/?)
(6:00 AM) (crime) Armored Car Robbery (1950/68 m/Richard Fleischer)
(7:30 AM) (crime) The Asphalt Jungle (1950/112 m/John Huston)
(9:30 AM) (crime) High Sierra (1941/100 m/Raoul Walsh)
(11:15 AM) (crime) Rififi (1954/118 m/Jules Dassin)
(1:30 PM) (crime) The League Of Gentlemen (1960/114 m/Basil Dearden)
(3:45 PM) (comedy) Ocean’s 11 (1960/127 m/Lewis Milestone)
(6:00 PM) (suspense) Jack of Diamonds (1967/108 m/Don Taylor)
(8:00 PM) (premiere) Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (episode 2) (2019/61 m/Mark Cousins)
(9:15 PM) (premiere) El Camino (1963/95 m/Ana Mariscal)
(11:15 PM) (documentary) Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (episode #2) (2019/61 m/Mark Cousins)
Wednesday, September 09, 2020
(12:30 AM) (premiere) Lovely & Amazing (2001/91 m/Nicole Holofcener)
(2:15 AM) (premiere) Wanda (1970/103 m/Barbara Loden)
(4:15 AM) (premiere) The Watermelon Woman (1995/85 m/Cheryl Dunye)
(6:00 AM) (premiere) In The Empty City (2004/90 m/Maria Jopo Ganga)
(7:45 AM) (silent) The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926/66 m/Lotte Reiniger)
(9:15 AM) (premiere) Entre Nous (1983/111 m/Diane Kurys)
(11:30 AM) (drama) Jeopardy (1953/69 m/John Sturges)
(1:00 PM) (suspense) Cry Terror! (1958/96 m/Andrew L. Stone)
(3:15 PM) (drama) The Devil Makes Three (1952/90 m/Andrew Marton)
(5:00 PM) (suspense) Dial 1119 (1950/75 m/Gerald Mayer)
(6:30 PM) (suspense) Beyond A Reasonable Doubt (1956/80 m/Fritz Lang)
(8:00 PM) (comedy) Mr. Belvedere Goes To College (1949/83 m/Elliott Nugent)
(11:30 PM) (premiere) Blondie Goes To College (1942/77 m/Frank R. Strayer)
Thursday, September 10, 2020
(1:00 AM) (musical) She's Working Her Way Through College (1952/101 m/Bruce Humberstone)
(3:00 AM) Start Cheering (1938/78 m/Albert S. Rogell)
(4:30 AM) Strictly Dynamite (1934/71 m/Elliott Nugent)
(6:00 AM) (drama) Mademoiselle Fifi (1944/69 m/Robert Wise)
(7:15 AM) (suspense) The Curse of the Cat People (1944/70 m/Gunther V. Fritsch and Robert Wise)
(8:30 AM) (horror) The Body Snatcher (1945/78 m/Robert Wise)
(10:00 AM) (suspense) Mystery In Mexico (1948/66 m/Robert Wise)
(11:15 AM) (western) Blood On the Moon (1948/?/Robert Wise)
(1:00 PM) (crime) Born To Kill (1947/92 m/Robert Wise)
(2:45 PM) (drama) The Set-Up (1949/72 m/Robert Wise)
(4:15 PM) (romance) So Big (1953/102 m/Robert Wise)
(6:00 PM) (drama) Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956/113 m/Robert Wise)
(9:00 PM) (war) So Proudly We Hail (1943/126 m/Mark Sandrich)
(10:15 PM) (comedy) MAS*H (1970/116 m/Robert Altman)
Friday, September 11, 2020
(12:30 AM) (war) The Story of Dr. Wassell (1944/136 m/Cecil B. DeMille)
(3:00 AM) (war) Cry ‘Havoc’ (1944/97 m/Richard Thorpe)
(4:45 AM) (war) Battle Circus (1953/90 m/Richard Brooks)
(6:30 AM) (short) Angel Of Mercy (1939/10 m/Edward L. Cahn)
(6:45 AM) (drama) The White Angel (1936/92 m/William Dieterle)
(9:30 AM) (comedy) Bud Abbott and Lou Costello In Hollywood (1945/83 m/S. Sylvan Simon)
(10:00 AM) (comedy) Merton of the Movies (1947/82 m/Robert Alton)
(11:30 AM) (musical) Show Girl in Hollywood (1930/78 m/Mervyn Le Roy)
(1:00 PM) (comedy) Goldie Gets Along (1933/68 m/Malcolm St. Clair)
(2:15 PM) (musical) Talent Scout (1937/62 m/William Clemens)
(3:30 PM) (comedy) Pick A Star (1937/70 m/Edward Sedgwick)
(4:45 PM) (comedy) Boy Meets Girl (1938/86 m/Lloyd Bacon)
(6:15 PM) (comedy) Movie Crazy (1932/96 m/Clyde Bruckman)
(8:00 PM) (adventure) She (1965/106 m/Robert Day)
(10:00 PM) (adventure) Clash of the Titans (1981/118 m/Desmond Davis)
Saturday, September 12, 2020
(12:15 AM) (comedy) Casino Royale (1967/131 m/John Huston, et. al.)
(2:45 AM) (horror) Plan 9 From Outer Space (1959/78 m/Edward D. Wood, Jr.)
(4:15 AM) (drama) Reefer Madness (1936/66 m/Louis Gasnier)
(5:15 AM) (premiere) Sex Madness (1938/52 m/?
(6:15 AM) (comedy) A Slight Case Of Murder (1938/85 m/Lloyd Bacon)
(9:00 AM) (premiere) MGM CARTOONS: Droopy’s Double Trouble (1951/7 m/Fred [Tex] Avery)
(9:09 AM) (short) High Dive Kids (1956/8 m/?)
(9:18 AM) (short) Sitka and Juneau: A Tale of Two Cities (1940/9 m/?)
(9:28 AM) (drama) Daredevil Drivers (1938/60 m/B. Reeves Eason)
(9:30 AM) (serial) TERRY AND THE PIRATES: Pyre of Death (1940/17 m/?)
(10:00 AM) (premiere) POPEYE: Pip-Eye, Pup-Eye, Poop-Eye An' Peep-Eye (1942/6 m/Dave Fleischer)
(10:08 AM) (adventure) The Lion Hunters (1951/80 m/Ford Beebe)
(11:30 AM) (short) The Rear Gunner (1943/20 m/Ray Enright)
(12:00 PM) (crime) Double Indemnity (1944/108 m/Billy Wilder)
(2:00 PM) (drama) Birdman of Alcatraz (1962/149 m/John Frankenheimer)
(4:45 PM) (war) The Sand Pebbles (1966/179 m/Robert Wise)
(8:00 PM) (suspense) Out of the Past (1947/97 m/Jacques Tourneur)
(10:00 PM) (drama) Experiment Perilous (1944/91 m/Jacques Tourneur)
Sunday, September 13, 2020
(12:00 AM) (suspense) Danger Signal (1945/78 m/Robert Florey)
(1:30 AM) (drama) The China Syndrome (1979/122 m/James Bridges)
(3:45 AM) (horror) Coma (1978/113 m/Michael Crichton)
(6:00 AM) (comedy) See Here, Private Hargrove (1944/101 m/Wesley Ruggles)
(9:00 AM) (musical) Summer Stock (1950/109 m/Charles Walters)
(10:00 AM) (suspense) Danger Signal (1945/78 m/Robert Florey)
(11:30 AM) (comedy) The Whole Town’s Talking (1935/93 m/John Ford)
(1:15 PM) (drama) The Last Hurrah (1958/121 m/John Ford)
(3:30 PM) (drama) Sweet Bird Of Youth (1962/120 m/Richard Brooks)
(5:45 PM) (adventure) The Black Stallion (1979/117 m/Carroll Ballard)
(8:00 PM) (musical) Carmen Jones (1954/105 m/Otto Preminger)
(10:00 PM) (drama) Bright Road (1953/68 m/Gerald Mayer)
(11:30 PM) (musical) Sun Valley Serenade (1941/86 m/H. Bruce Humberstone)
Monday, September 14, 2020
(1:15 AM) (silent) The Ace of Hearts (1921/74 m/Wallace Worsley)
(6:00 AM) (musical) Playing Around (1930/66 m/Mervyn Le Roy)
(7:15 AM) (drama) Union Depot (1932/67 m/Alfred E. Green)
(9:30 AM) (drama) When In Rome (1952/78 m/Clarence Brown)
(10:00 AM) (drama) The Toast Of New York (1937/109 m/Rowland V. Lee)
(12:00 PM) (musical) Fashions of 1934 (1934/78 m/William Dieterle)
(1:30 PM) (suspense) Kind Lady (1935/76 m/George B. Seitz)
(3:00 PM) (romance) Sylvia Scarlett (1935/95 m/George Cukor)
(4:45 PM) (romance) Nobody Lives Forever (1946/100 m/Jean Negulesco)
(6:30 PM) (suspense) Cast a Dark Shadow (1955/83 m/Lewis Gilbert)
(8:00 PM) (short) Star Night At the Cocoanut Grove (1934/20 m/Louis Lewyn)
(8:00 PM) (short) A Night At The Movies (1937/10 m/Roy Rowland)
(8:00 PM) (comedy) The Pip From Pittsburg (1931/21 m/James Parrott)
(8:00 PM) (short) Movie Pests (1944/10 m/Will Jason)
(8:00 PM) (short) So You Want To Be A Detective (1948/11 m/Richard Bare)
(8:00 PM) (short) Los Angeles “Wonder City of the West” (1935/8 m/?)
(8:00 PM) (short) The Man In The Barn (1937/11 m/Jacques Tourneur)
(8:00 PM) (short) Smash Your Baggage (1932/9 m/Roy Mack)
(10:00 PM) (short) Asleep In The Feet (1933/19 m/Gus Meins)
(10:00 PM) (comedy) Top Flat (1935/19 m/William Terhune)
(10:00 PM) (short) The Bargain of the Century (1933/19 m/Charley Chase)
(11:15 PM) (short) You’re Telling Me (1932/19 m/Lloyd French)
(11:15 PM) (short) Call A Cop! (1931/20 m/George Stevens)
(11:15 PM) (short) Too Many Women (1932/19 m/Lloyd French)
(11:15 PM) (short) Air-Tight (1931/17 m/George Stevens)
Tuesday, September 15, 2020
(12:45 AM) (comedy) Buzzin’ Around (1933/20 m/Alfred J. Goulding)
(12:45 AM) (short) Whispering Whoopee (1930/21 m/James W. Horne)
(2:00 AM) (short) Women In Hiding (1940/22 m/Joseph Newman)
(2:00 AM) (short) Drunk Driving (1939/21 m/David Miller)
(2:00 AM) (short) The Public Pays (1936/18 m/Errol Taggart)
(3:15 AM) (short) His Silent Racket (1933/18 m/Charley Chase
(3:15 AM) (short) Girl Shock (1930/20 m/James W. Horne)
(3:15 AM) (short) Fallen Arches (1933/19 m/Gus Meins)
(3:15 AM) (short) The Chases of Pimple Street (1934/20 m/Charles Parrott)
(3:15 AM) (short) Four Parts (1934/18 m/Eddie Dunn)
(5:00 AM) (short) So You Want To Play The Piano (1956/10 m/Richard Bare)
(5:00 AM) (short) Apples To You! (1934/20 m/Leigh Jason)
(5:00 AM) (short) Zion: Canyon of Colour (1934/8 m/?)
(5:00 AM) (short) How To Sleep (1935/11 m/Nick Grindé)
(5:00 AM) (short) Double Talk (1937/11 m/Lloyd French)
(5:00 AM) (western) Pony Express Days (1940/20 m/B. Reeves Eason)
(5:00 AM) (comedy) Important Business (1944/11 m/Will Jason)
(5:00 AM) (short) The Black Network (1936/21 m/Roy Mack)
(5:00 AM) (short) And She Learned About Dames (1934/?/?)
(5:00 AM) (short) The Fabulous Fraud (1948/11 m/Edward L. Cahn)
(7:15 AM) (suspense) Man Hunt (1933/64 m/Irving Cummings)
(8:30 AM) (suspense) Nick Carter, Master Detective (1939/59 m/Jac ques Tourneur)
(9:45 AM) (suspense) Phantom Raiders (1940/70 m/Jacques Tourneur)
(11:00 AM) (suspense) Sky Murder (1940/72 m/George B. Seitz)
(12:15 PM) (suspense) Star Of Midnight (1935/90 m/Stephen Roberts)
(2:00 PM) (suspense) Miracles For Sale (1939/71 m/Tod Browning)
(3:15 PM) (suspense) Eyes In The Night (1942/80 m/Fred Zinnemann)
(4:45 PM) (suspense) The Hidden Eye (1945/69 m/Richard Whorf)
(6:00 PM) (suspense) Stage Fright (1950/110 m/Alfred Hitchcock)
(9:00 PM) (premiere) Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (episode 3) (2019/61 m/Mark Cousins)
(9:15 PM) (documentary) Harlan County, U.S.A. (1976/105 m/Barbara Kopple)
(11:15 PM) (documentary) Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (episode 3) (2019/61 m/Mark Cousins)
Wednesday, September 16, 2020
(12:30 AM) (drama) The Virgin Suicides (1999/97 m/Sofia Coppola)
(2:30 AM) (premiere) Loving Couples (1964/113 m/Mai Zetterling)
(6:30 AM) (premiere) 10 to 11 (2009/110 m/Pelin Esmer)
(9:30 AM) (comedy) Losing Ground (1982/86 m/Kathleen Collins)
(10:00 AM) (premiere) Strangers In Good Company (1990/101 m/Cynthia Scott)
(12:00 PM) (short) Wagon Wheels West (1943/17 m/B. Reeves Eason)
(12:30 PM) (western) Westward The Women (1951/116 m/William A. Wellman)
(2:45 PM) (western) Strange Lady In Town (1955/112 m/Mervyn Le Roy)
(4:45 PM) (western) Rachel and the Stranger (1948/93 m/Norman Foster)
(6:15 PM) (western) Cat Ballou (1965/96 m/Elliot Silverstein)
(8:00 PM) (musical) A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1949/107 m/Tay Garnett)
(10:00 PM) (premiere) Peggy Sue Got Married (1986/103 m/Francis Ford Coppola)
Thursday, September 17, 2020
(12:00 AM) (premiere) Repeat Performance (1947/93 m/Alfred Werker)
(1:45 AM) (drama) Turn Back the Clock (1933/79 m/Edgar Selwyn)
(3:15 AM) (adventure) The Boy and the Pirates (1960/84 m/Bert I. Gordon)
(5:00 AM) (romance) Berkeley Square (1933/88 m/Frank Lloyd)
(6:45 AM) (short) MGM Is On The Move! (1964/36 m/?)
(7:45 AM) (crime) Angel Face (1953/91 m/Otto Preminger)
(9:30 AM) (western) River of No Return (1954/91 m/Otto Preminger)
(11:15 AM) (suspense) Bunny Lake Is Missing (1965/107 m/Otto Preminger)
(1:15 PM) (drama) The Man with the Golden Arm (1956/119 m/Otto Preminger)
(3:30 PM) (drama) Anatomy Of A Murder (1959/161 m/Otto Preminger)
(6:15 PM) (suspense) Laura (1944/88 m/Otto Preminger)
(8:00 PM) (comedy) People Will Talk (1951/110 m/Joseph L. Mankiewicz)
(10:00 PM) (drama) Magnificent Obsession (1954/108 m/Douglas Sirk)
Friday, September 18, 2020
(12:00 AM) (drama) A Man to Remember (1938/78 m/Garson Kanin)
(1:30 AM) (drama) The Citadel (1938/113 m/King Vidor)
(3:30 AM) (drama) Red Beard (1965/185 m/Akira Kurosawa)
(6:45 AM) (drama) The Doctor and the Girl (1949/98 m/Curtis Bernhardt)
(9:30 AM) (romance) Dark Victory (1939/104 m/Edmund Goulding)
(10:30 AM) (romance) The Painted Veil (1934/84 m/Richard Boleslawski)
(12:00 PM) (romance) Conquest (1937/112 m/Clarence Brown)
(2:00 PM) (romance) Camille (1937/109 m/George Cukor)
(4:00 PM) (comedy) Ninotchka (1939/110 m/Ernst Lubitsch)
(6:00 PM) Grand Hotel (1932/113 m/Edmund Goulding)
(8:00 PM) (drama) The Rain People (1969/101 m/Francis Ford Coppola)
(10:00 PM) (drama) Harry and Tonto (1974/115 m/Paul Mazursky)
Saturday, September 19, 2020
(12:00 AM) (comedy) Lost In America (1985/91 m/Albert Brooks)
(2:00 AM) (premiere) Wild At Heart (1990/124 m/David Lynch)
(4:15 AM) (premiere) Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992/135 m/David Lynch)
(6:30 AM) (suspense) Blackmail (1939/81 m/H.C. Potter)
(9:00 AM) (premiere) MGM CARTOONS: The Flea Circus (1954/7 m/Fred [Tex] Avery)
(9:09 AM) (short) Holland Sailing (1956/8 m/?)
(9:18 AM) (short) Alluring Alaska (1941/9 m/?)
(9:27 AM) (western) Guns Of Hate (1948/62 m/Lesley Selander)
(9:30 AM) (serial) TERRY AND THE PIRATES: The Secret of the Temple (1940/17 m/?)
(10:00 AM) (premiere) POPEYE: Olive Oyl and Water Don't Mix (1933/7 m/Dave Fleischer)
(10:08 AM) (adventure) African Treasure (1952/70 m/Ford Beebe)
(11:30 AM) (short) Roaring Guns (1944/19 m/Jean Negulesco)
(12:00 PM) (drama) Going Home (1971/97 m/Herbert B. Leonard)
(1:45 PM) (western) 3:10 To Yuma (1957/92 m/Delmer Daves)
(3:30 PM) (drama) Fail-Safe (1964/112 m/Sidney Lumet)
(5:30 PM) (war) Sergeant York (1941/134 m/Howard Hawks)
(8:00 PM) (musical) Guys and Dolls (1955/149 m/Joseph L. Mankiewicz)
(10:45 PM) (crime) Midnight Alibi (1934/58 m/Alan Crosland)
Sunday, September 20, 2020
(12:00 AM) (suspense) Gilda (1946/110 m/Charles Vidor)
(2:15 AM) (sci-fi) Rollerball (1975/125 m/Norman Jewison)
(4:30 AM) (sci-fi) Countdown (1968/101 m/Robert Altman)
(6:15 AM) (drama) All The King’s Men (1949/110 m/Robert Rossen)
(9:15 AM) (comedy) It Happened One Night (1934/105 m/Frank Capra)
(10:00 AM) (suspense) Gilda (1946/110 m/Charles Vidor)
(12:15 PM) (musical) Going My Way (1944/127 m/Leo McCarey)
(2:30 PM) (musical) Royal Wedding (1951/93 m/Stanley Donen)
(4:15 PM) (musical) Dangerous When Wet (1953/95 m/Charles Walters)
(6:00 PM) (comedy) Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner? (1967/108 m/Stanley Kramer)
(8:00 PM) (premiere) Tamango (1959/100 m/John Berry)
(10:00 PM) (adventure) Tarzan’s Peril (1951/79 m/Byron Haskin)
(11:30 PM) (drama) The Harlem Globetrotters (1951/77 m/Phil Brown)
Monday, September 21, 2020
(1:00 AM) (premiere) Where Now Are The Dreams Of Youth? (1932/86 m/Yasujiro Ozu)
(2:45 AM) (premiere) LONE WOLF AND CUB: Baby Cart in the Land of Demons (1973/90 m/Kenji Misumi)
(4:30 AM) (premiere) LONE WOLF AND CUB: White Heaven In Hell (1974/84 m/Yoshiyuki Kuroda)
(6:00 AM) (silent) Flesh and the Devil (1926/112 m/Clarence Brown)
(9:15 AM) (romance) To Have and Have Not (1944/100 m/Howard Hawks)
(10:15 AM) (crime) The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946/113 m/Tay Garnett)
(12:30 PM) (romance) Possessed (1931/76 m/Clarence Brown)
(2:00 PM) (comedy) Woman of the Year (1942/114 m/George Stevens)
(4:15 PM) (romance) Swing Shift (1984/100 m/Jonathan Demme)
(6:00 PM) (drama) Stromboli (1950/106 m/Roberto Rossellini)
(8:00 PM) (drama) A Cry In The Dark (1988/121 m/Fred Schepisi)
(10:15 PM) (romance) The French Lieutenant’s Woman (1981/124 m/Karel Reisz)
Tuesday, September 22, 2020
(2:30 AM) (drama) Kramer vs. Kramer (1979/105 m/Robert Benton)
(4:30 AM) (drama) Wednesday’s Child (1934/68 m/John Robertson)
(6:00 AM) (documentary) MGM Parade Show #4 (1955/26 m/?)
(6:30 AM) (epic) Around The World In 80 Days (1956/182 m/Michael Anderson)
(9:45 AM) (musical) Bitter Sweet (1940/93 m/W.S. Van Dyke II)
(11:30 AM) (war) In Which We Serve (1942/115 m/Noel Coward)
(1:30 PM) (comedy) Private Lives (1931/84 m/Sidney Franklin)
(3:00 PM) (romance) We Were Dancing (1942/95 m/Robert Z. Leonard)
(4:45 PM) (comedy) Blithe Spirit (1945/96 m/David Lean)
(6:30 PM) (romance) Brief Encounter (1945/87 m/David Lean)
(9:00 PM) (premiere) Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (episode 4) (2019/61 m/Mark Cousins)
(9:15 PM) (premiere) The Cave of the Yellow Dog (2005/89 m/Byambasuren Davaa)
(11:00 PM) (documentary) Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (episode 4) (2019/61 m/Mark Cousins)
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
(12:15 AM) (crime) Salaam Bombay! (1988/114 m/Mira Nair)
(2:30 AM) (drama) Daughters of the Dust (1991/112 m/Julie Dash)
(4:30 AM) (premiere) Krane’s Confectionary (1951/103 m/Astrid Henning-Jensen)
(6:30 AM) (premiere) Mikey and Nicky (1976/107 m/Elaine May)
(9:45 AM) (premiere) The Juniper Tree (1990/79 m/Nietzchka Keene)
(10:15 AM) (premiere) Women Who Loved Cinema (Part 1 & 2) (2002/114 m/Marianne Khoury)
(12:15 PM) (comedy) Life Begins For Andy Hardy (1941/101 m/George B. Seitz)
2:00 PM) (musical) Girl Crazy (1943/Norman Taurog)
(4:00 PM) (adventure) The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1939/91 m/Richard Thorpe)
(6:00 PM) (comedy) Ah, Wilderness! (1935/98 m/Clarence Brown)\
(8:00 PM) (drama) Boys Town (1938/93 m/Norman Taurog)
(9:45 PM) (drama) The Human Comedy (1943/117 m/Clarence Brown)
Thursday, September 24, 2020
(12:00 AM) (adventure) The Black Stallion (1979/117 m/Carroll Ballard)
(2:15 AM) (musical) Strike Up The Band (1940/120 m/Busby Berkeley)
(4:30 AM) (crime) Killer McCoy (1947/104 m/Roy Rowland)
(6:15 AM) (romance) Wuthering Heights (1939/104 m/William Wyler)
(9:15 AM) (romance) Kitty Foyle (1940/108 m/Sam Wood)
(10:15 AM) (drama) Cass Timberlane (1947/119 m/George Sidney)
(12:15 PM) (drama) The Bad and the Beautiful (1952/118 m/Vincente Minnelli)
(2:30 PM) (drama) Magnificent Obsession (1954/108 m/Douglas Sirk)
(4:30 PM) (drama) All That Heaven Allows (1955/89 m/Douglas Sirk)
(6:15 PM) Written On The Wind (1957/99 m/Douglas Sirk)
(8:00 PM) (drama) Young Dr. Kildare (1938/82 m/Harold S. Bucquet)
(9:30 PM) (drama) The Young Doctors (1961/103 m/Phil Karlson)
(11:30 PM) (comedy) The Hospital (1971/102 m/Arthur Hiller)
Friday, September 25, 2020
(1:30 AM) (drama) No Way Out (1950/107 m/Joseph L. Mankiewicz)
(3:30 AM) (drama) The Girl In White (1952/93 m/John Sturges)
(5:04 AM) (short) Her Honor, The Nurse (1956/8 m/Harry W. Smith)
(5:30 AM) (drama) Emergency Hospital (1956/63 m/Lee Sholem)
(6:45 AM) (horror) War of the Planets (1965/97 m/Antonio Margheriti)
(9:30 AM) (horror) The Cosmic Monster (1958/72 m/Gilbert Gunn)
(10:00 AM) (horror) Satellite In The Sky (1956/84 m/Paul Dickson)
(11:30 AM) (horror) The Green Slime (1969/90 m/Kinji Fukasaku)
(1:15 PM) (horror) Queen of Outer Space (1958/80 m/Edward Bernds)
(2:45 PM) (horror) The Wild, Wild Planet (1965/94 m/Anthony Dawson)
(4:30 PM) (horror) Village of the Damned (1960/77 m/Wolf Rilla)
(6:00 PM) (horror) Children of the Damned (1964/90 m/Anton M. Leader)
(9:00 PM) (western) The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976/136 m/Clint Eastwood)
(10:30 PM) (western) Alvarez Kelly (1966/110 m/Edward Dmytryk)
Saturday, September 26, 2020
(12:45 AM) (western) Springfield Rifle (1952/93 m/Andre de Toth)
(6:00 AM) (comedy) Larceny, Inc. (1942/95 m/Lloyd Bacon)
(9:00 AM) (premiere) MGM CARTOONS: The First Bad Man (1955/7 m/Fred [Tex] Avery)
(9:09 AM) (short) Salar, The Leaper (1957/8 m/Douglas Sinclair)
(9:18 AM) (documentary) Land of Alaska Nellie (1940/9 m/?)
(9:28 AM) (western) Gun Law (1938/60 m/David Howard)
(9:30 AM) (serial) WILD WEST DAYS: Death Rides The Range (1937/?/?)
(10:00 AM) (premiere) POPEYE: Many Tanks (1933/7 m/Dave Fleischer)
(10:09 AM) (adventure) Bomba and the Jungle Girls (1952/70 m/Ford Beebe)
(11:30 AM) (short) Heavenly Music (1943/22 m/Josef Berne)
(12:00 PM) (drama) The Long Voyage Home (1940/106 m/John Ford)
(2:00 PM) (epic) Quo Vadis (1951/174 m/Mervyn LeRoy)
(5:15 PM) (war) Where Eagles Dare (1968/155 m/Brian G. Hutton)
(8:00 PM) (romance) The Red Shoes (1948/134 m/Michael Powell)
(10:30 PM) (war) Night Ambush (1958/105 m/Michael Powell)
Sunday, September 27, 2020
(12:15 AM) (drama) They Won’t Believe Me (1947/90 m/Irving Pichel)
(2:00 AM) (horror) Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954/79 m/Jack Arnold)
(3:30 AM) (horror) UFO (1956/88 m/Winston Jones)
(5:15 AM) (documentary) MGM Parade Show #4 (1955/26 m/?)
(6:00 AM) (romance) Mata Hari (1931/89 m/George Fitzmaurice)
(7:45 AM) (comedy) The Talk Of The Town (1942/117 m/George Stevens)
(10:00 AM) (drama) They Won't Believe Me (1947/90 m/Irving Pichel)
(11:45 AM) (comedy) Don't Make Waves (1967/97 m/Alexander Mackendrick)
(1:30 PM) (drama) Honeysuckle Rose (1980/119 m/Jerry Schatzberg)
(3:45 PM) (romance) Now, Voyager (1942/117 m/Irving Rapper)
(6:00 PM) (drama) Executive Suite (1954/104 m/Robert Wise)
(10:15 PM) (drama) The Decks Ran Red (1958/84 m/Andrew L. Stone)
(12:00 AM) (comedy) Our Modern Maidens (1929/75 m/Jack Conway)
(2:00 AM) (musical) Black Orpheus (1959/108 m/Marcel Camus)
(4:00 AM) (romance) Orpheus (1950/96 m/Jean Cocteau)
Monday, September 28, 2020
(6:00 AM) (comedy) Not So Dumb (1930/76 m/King Vidor)
(7:30 AM) (drama) Street Scene (1931/79 m/King Vidor)
(9:00 AM) (adventure) Bird of Paradise (1932/82 m/King Vidor)
(10:30 AM) (drama) Our Daily Bread (1934/74 m/King Vidor)
(11:45 AM) (western) Northwest Passage (1940/127 m/King Vidor)
(2:00 PM) (drama) H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941/120 m/King Vidor)
(4:15 PM) (drama) The Fountainhead (1949/113 m/King Vidor)
(6:15 PM) (crime) Lightning Strikes Twice (1951/90 m/King Vidor)
(9:00 PM) (comedy) You Can't Take It With You (1938/126 m/Frank Capra)
(10:30 PM) (drama) Ship of Fools (1965/149 m/Stanley Kramer)
(1:15 AM) (premiere) Titicut Follies (1967/84 m/Frederick Wiseman)
(3:00 AM) (drama) The Sign of the Ram (1948/84 m/John Sturges)
(5:00 AM) (documentary) Private Screenings: Liza Minnelli (2010/45 m/Sean Cameron)
Tuesday, September 29, 2020
(6:00 AM) (drama) Blossoms in the Dust (1941/99 m/Mervyn LeRoy)
(9:00 AM) (romance) Mrs. Parkington (1944/124 m/Tay Garnett)
(10:30 AM) (drama) Madame Curie (1943/124 m/Mervyn Le Roy)
(1:00 PM) (romance) The Valley of Decision (1945/118 m/Tay Garnett)
(3:15 PM) (romance) Pride and Prejudice (1940/118 m/Robert Z. Leonard)
(5:30 PM) (war) Mrs. Miniver (1942/134 m/William Wyler)
(8:00 PM) (premiere) Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (episode 5) (2019/61 m/Mark Cousins)
(9:15 PM) (drama) Middle of Nowhere (2012/101 m/Ava Duvernay)
(11:15 PM) (documentary) Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (episode 5) (2019/61 m/Mark Cousins)
Wednesday, September 30, 2020
(12:30 AM) (drama) Beau Travail (1999/89 m/Claire Denis)
(6:00 AM) (premiere) Wasp (2003/26 m/Andrea Arnold)
(10:00 AM) (drama) Antonia's Line (1995/103 m/Marleen Gorris)
(12:00 PM) (premiere) The Green-Eyed Blonde (1957/72 m/Bernard Girard)
(1:15 PM) (crime) Ring of Fire (1961/91/Andrew L. Stone)
(2:45 PM) (drama) Untamed Youth (1957/80 m/Howard W. Koch)
(4:15 PM) (musical) Jailhouse Rock (1957/97 m/Richard Thorpe)
(6:00 PM) (drama) Rebel Without A Cause (1955/111 m/Nicholas Ray)
(8:00 PM) (drama) Stand and Deliver (1988/103 m/Ramon Menendez)
(10:00 PM) (drama) The Blackboard Jungle (1955/101 m/Richard Brooks)
submitted by tombstoneshadows28 to movies [link] [comments]

Gianni Russo Fraudulent Claims

  1. He claims he was Basically Frank Costello's adopted son in law.. says Costello saw him on the street in Little Italy in the late 40s/early 50s, got to know him, and then started sending him to pick up gambling slips, then gradually upped his responsibility, to eventually he was flying to Vegas assumedly before Genovese's hit attempt on Frank to pick up Casino skim ...this serms ludicrous to me as he wouldve been not even 20 when doing this? Any thoughts? Do any of you guys have accurate info on Russo's ties to the Mafia..i don't doubt he had mob ties, but the way he tells it he was like an honorary consigliere.
  2. He claims he was the one who brokered the deal between Joe Columbo and Al Ruddy/ Bob Evans from Paramount to get The Godfather actually made? He says the Mob had the main gate at Paramount studios blown up as a message to not make the movie? ... ive literally never heard that portion of the story and ive read alot on the making of The Godfather and seen 2 documentaries on the movie and never once mentioned this fact....Russo claims that the head of Paramounts secretary at this time said "shit we rrall have a problem with the Mafia, the man we need to fix this is Gianni Russo, and thats how he got approached to broker a deal.....also claims that part of this deal was that he had to play either the part of Michael, Sonny, or Carlo...the two main parts that went to all time great actors.... Idk how or why he'd be able to sit down w a boss and arrange this or anything remotely true about his storybut... u gotta listen to this part alone its very hard to believe but so delusional its amazing
  3. He claims he knew John Gotti, among many other made men in all families... claims Gotti didnt like him before he was boss bc he was jealous of Russos wealth and connections in the Mob? This is laughable but again u gotta listen to it for shits and giggles
  4. He claims on this show that he killed 3 men( yes he actually admits to it .. u havr to hear this to believe it).. although he qualified his statement by saying they were all in self defense.. and the one in the NyT article he goes into detail in the podcast that the guy he killed was Medellin cartel member that was #2 under Pablo who attempted to kill a woman in his restaurant, he interceded, killed him after he stabbed Russo.. then Russo finds out the Cartel had a hit on him.. so he goes to see John Gotti who is boss now and asked for his help to get outta America and to Bogota to straighten this out.. Gotti declines but he went anyway, the Cartel finds him, kidnaps him, is about to torture him when Ewcobar himself recognized him as Carlo from the GF, then they proceed to run lines snd hes released..... then he says the brother of the guy he whacked wasnsome ex military Sicario who found him at his club/casino in Vegas; he then confronted the guy, challenged him to a duel outside and then on the way ambushed him, beat him to death by puncturing his lungs amd causing him to drown on his blood in his lungs....i know how fuckin batshit this sounds ... again highly recommend listening to this its so crazy insane its insanely entertaining
  5. He claims he was tight with Fat Tony Salernos crew, and that he was w the GF cast pre production in Patsys in East Harlem with Brando.. said this place was controlled by Salerno and also at this time Brando questioned why he got the part since he had zero acting experience to which Russo says i was given this part as a favor to Joe Columbo and then he threatened Marlon not to fuck up his big break in front of Salernos men who were there in the back playing Ziganette at this mob joint.
He also claims to have killed other men he cant talk about, ,claims to have made millions in OC before he ever started acting, that he has 11 kids by 10 women, that he has so much property and boats and cars.....oh and that he fucked Marilyn Monroe while still a teenager.....it's like this he never heard theres no statute of limitations on murder
Also he shits on James Caan and highlights his real connections to the Columbos and the rest of the 5 families... anyone have any insight on Russo and the mob and thoughts on his wild fuckin claims... he mentions other mob shit too Im blanking on
If you go to Itunes podcast and search "Gilbert Gottfrieds Amazing Colossal Podcast" then scroll down to early 2015 episodes ull see Russos he was like the 3rd or 4th one.. and its totally free..... its an hr long and so worth it just to hear him brag and telling crazy fuckin stories
submitted by Moveinslience to Mafia [link] [comments]

Yung Lean Radio Interview Transcript

[UNEDITED]
I saw that many of you non-swedes wanted to be able to enjoy the recent interview he did in Swedish. I have not had time to edit the text yet so it will be filled with spelling mistakes and such but if I have time later on I might fix that. The interviewer is called Mats Nileskär and he alternates between asking questions and explaining stuff so that's why sometimes it's just him retelling things that lean said earlier. Anyways here is the transcript:
Mats:
There was once a sixteenyearold full of love for screw, drill and Florida trap. Full of fascination for fantasy figures and the cinematic. He rapped honest, drowsy, tentatively and almost apathetic to strange, mind expanding beats. Music that didnt exist in reality. Yung leans journey from his laptop in his room in Södermalm, to sold out shows and rock star dreams in the country of Hip Hop. It is one of the most beautiful stories in the history of Swedish music. And like all beautiful stories it holds plentiful of darkness. Yung Lean could have ruined everything and been scarified on the emo rap scene. Instead he became the influential survivor. Yung Lean and the producer friends in Sad Boys changed the world and intertwined with something beyond their own existence.
Lean:
I usually don’t sit and count who my influences are. Because I have always had a lot of my own influences that I have payed homage to. But sometimes I don’t think about stuff and then I get a dm on Instagram. Like I got a dm from Trippie Redd that read like “Shoutout to one of my biggest influences.”
Music break
Ugly God. Like lots of rappers that I wouldn’t think were fans of me. Then there are these that are a bit more obvious like maybe suicide boys, Pouya. When they meet me at festivals, they are fans. And I don’t want to come off as bragging, it is the same way when, like I met young thug once in New York, and then I get star struck, I am a fan of him, nothing weird about that. But there is like, you know, group from group, it goes back. If you look at Wu Tang, and then it goes down, it gets weirder, like Odd Future and Asap Mob. And when we started, there was probably more people that thought like, like Yung Sherman, Yung Gud, Bladee, and all in Drain Gang and Sad boys and this is what we look like, we can also do this. I think we made it even more easy to access. And even more like, you only need a computer and internet. And less of, like maybe you don’t even have to skate, maybe you don’t even have to live in New York. More of like, you have a concept, and we were strict with that concept, we had a clear aesthetic, a clear way of making music videos, a clear message. It was easy to take things from that goth aspect, or the sad aspect, or like, people had purple hair like Ecco had. People dressed exactly like Bladee or Sherman, or rapped like me. And I still think that I see that today. And I’m proud, and I’m happy. I don’t see it as something negative, like, shit these boys are stealing or all these rappers are stealing, it’s more like, in that case I have also stolen. Everyone has been influenced by something, and as long as you are not ashamed about that, it’s okay, because that is how it goes. People can be like, I’ve never listened to Yung Lean, And I can see that they obviously have, and like…
Music break (Unreleased Lean)
Lean:
We got a lot of the autotune aspect from, like Bladee and Whitearmor started using it a lot, and me and Micke (Gud) used it a lot. For us that was inspired by Future and Atlanta. And Casino and the first FBG mixtapes with young scooter and all those. Like those were using autotune. But we were from Europe, like, we are from The Knife country, Håkan Hellström, Broder Daniel (Swedish artists), it is more like Kraftwerk when we do it. It is more monotone, a bit more dead, maybe a bit more ABBA english. It is a bit more depressing I think. And that is not something you try to do, it just ends up like that. And then I think that, a mix of that, we we got big during 2013, Hip Hop went more Nihilistic, dark, it was grim. The way Chief Keef rapped, everything after Finally Rich, Bang 2, Almighty So, it was like melodies but dark mumbling about killing people. Hip Hop was going that way. You no longer had to have a hook like “Woke up in a new Ferrari”. The whole song could be the same melody.
Mats:
The bored and monotone mumbling turned into an anxiety lowering melody. And a manic flow of words. Yung Lean and sad boys, deeply uninterested in conventional song structures landed in the beginning of the start of a new era. Post Hip Hops surrealistic and psychedelic era. The new era was open for people that had not belong before. People that looked and sounded like Lean. A new sound, a new way to experience and listen to music. It was perplex and fascinating. Something Sad Boys happily utilized.
Lean:
Yeah, it’s true. As long as you, like for us it was the natural thing to do. For us it wasn’t that we were exploiting this style of music or what they were doing in the US. For us it was more like, I have rapped since I was a kid, same for making beats for Micke. Drain Gang had a punk band. All of us made music. And when the time came it was just logical for us to take part. Same with rapping in English, it just came naturally. I actually lived in Vietnam three years before that. My mom is a diplomat so I was in the English school and spoke English so rapping in English came naturally. That the beats were slowed down, that, like everything was a bit weird, it came naturally to us. And of course the timing was perfect, it wouldn’t have been able to come at a different time. I think I’ve said that before. That if that had happened in 2009 it would have felt fake. I would have had to be more of a Paul Wall character or like Petter (Swedish Rapper). I was very lucky with coming up during that time. But after all I was just being myself to 100%. I think that if I hadn’t been, it wouldn’t have worked out.
Music break
Lean:
Except for you and some others it was typically Swedish, a prime example of how it is in Sweden. A Swedish artist comes up, something they don’t recognise. They think it’s embarrassing. A Swedish sixteen year old boy from Södermalm, a middle class boy. He shouldn’t be doing this, it’s embarrassing. They wouldn’t want to touch me with a ten foot pole. He can’t be included here blah blah blah. But the second that the US started appreciating it and when he was in the New York Times or when he collaborates with Frank Ocean or other big names. Then they are ashamed of themselves. Like “Oh shit, he is Swedish, he is with us now…” It’s typical for Sweden, the law of Jante, like you shouldn’t think that you are somebody. That was basically what I witnessed since I was sixteen. It’s sad that we can’t trust each other and support everyone. I really believe that there is room for everyone to make it in Sweden.
Mats:
What did it do to you, experiencing this? The Journey from hate to understanding and in the end to love.
Lean:
I think that it might have been easier with hate. To be completely honest, if you look back at a lot of rappers, when they were hungry, when they were still hated or underground, they had so much to give. And I had that kind of idea in my head. That it was more exciting when Sweden hated me and I was only famous in the US. I really thought it was interesting. But I have matured now, time has passed, six seven years since we talked. The music I make now is different. If I had not been loved and was still hated, it would have been a bit perverse. Maybe then I had only been provoking just to provoke. I don’t like that. Right now I think I deserve to be where I am. I wouldn’t want to be in any other position.
Music break
Mats:
What happened when you got to the US for the first time, as an unlikely star?
Lean:
What happened? I can’t say I remember a lot. We were very young. Suddenly we were sitting in limousines. Lots of drugs, lots of illegal substances. We were very young, you know almost like a Metallica documentary, suddenly someone is sitting there with a knife in some group or something. No but a lot of things went downhill, but all the gigs were so much fun. It was some kind of friendship, like a family. You can’t take away all the gigs and the touring we did in the start. When we arrived in the US, it’s like, you know Femi, Emilios girlfriend, that has been with us since day one. She says it’s like we were all a part of Lost. Like the airplane crashed and when we meet each other now all of us know that we were part of that. Character wise I don’t remember anything that was any special. I remember us playing at Röda Sten in Gothenburg for 150 people. And when we got to New York we sold out Webster Hall twice, back to back. And rappers were contacting us, we were hanging out with artists. It was another level of respect. I guess I’m a bit like you there. I’m a hip hop nerd, always have been. When I started expressing myself through this music it was easier for Americans to understand what the fuck I was doing than for like a 40 year old Swedish man. So there’s nothing weird about that. But I wish I remembered more from the first tours (laughing).
Music break
Lean:
You are sixteen, you go to the US, you are living in some hotel, you get to meet some drug dealers from Florida whom are also promoters, they have a Cadillac, and someone is backstage and lots of different rappers are coming in and suddenly Travis Scott is there and blah blah blah. Things are happening all the time. You wake up in a bed there are people around and then you have to go on stage. (Lean starts talking about something else) Is that David Lynch? Sorry we are watching a movie, we are watching Dumbo. (Back to interview) I wasn’t really ready for that. That it was going to be so much work. You don’t think that but there is so much work. Now I can do many shows. Like the last tour that I did sober I was able to do like 70-80 shows and been able to do that but you are still tired. Like you have to workout and sleep. But back then, where did all the energy come from? Including all the drugs and the shitty sleep and all partying. I don’t understand it at all.
Mats:
Let’s talk some more about Florida. How was it to meet spaceghostpurrp who sort of created the foundation for what you got your inspiration from, the do it yourself attitude, punk, the south, three six mafia meets other genres in Florida. How was it to meet him?
Lean:
I-I have to be completely honest. Spaceghostpurrp is insane you know. He is crazy as a human being. I think he is bipolar and doesn’t take his meds. And the people who actually met him, I met Denzel Curry, Travis Scott and some other people from raider klan, while all the rest of Sad Boys met Spaceghostpurrp. Because I had a bad comedown. So I didn’t meet him that time but our old manager was a good friend of him and he is a misunderstood legend, he really is. But the whole thing about him is like Rocky, the pretty artist and the genius ugly duckling. We both know that Asap Rocky got more famous because he is prettier and it just fit better. The picture was prettier to give to the people than that of spaceghostpurrp who was kind of wacky. But yeah I hope that everything is good with him. I have no contact and don’t know how he is doing nowadays, I don’t. But blacklander was some of the best. I remember when that was released and I was in eight or ninth grade. First I was so into MF DOOM and madvillain and then suddenly I saw a picture of Odd Future and then spaceghostpurrp came and then that was what I wanted to listen to all the time. And via spaceghostpurrp, I remember he linked a lot of good artist that I started listening to. So then came Waka Flocka.
Mats:
It must have been like heaven, but as time would tell also hell. Landing in Florida.
Lean:
It feels good. We were there a bit too long but it’s such a special feeling. You can go to Everglade and see alligators and you really feel all that in fort lauderdale that is it like a swamp. We recorded at a place called pink house, pink mansion. They had a lot of brick that they had thrown down so that it became pink. Rick Ross had recorded there and it’s really Florida. People run around with machetes and it’s voodoo and all of that Haiti thing. Music break
Lean:
And then we were there in the pink mansion and recorded all of Warlord. It was insanely creative and it was like, I guess like when you read about Black Sabbath recording it feels like you have like a demon in you and you just make so much music and don’t realise what’s happening and yeah it ended up bad. It ended up with me at the psych ward, smashing a balcony and covering myself in the blood and the same night my manager died and then I got back to Sweden and was in convalescence, like at the psych ward. After that trip a lot of things changed in my life. I remember after a while when Hoover was released, maybe two months after. All the boys, I remember Axel and Benjamin, Bladee and Sherman was like, this might be Jonathans last video ever. And I was sure of that as well for a while. My mom helped me write a CV and I walked around with that and was thinking about working at a kindergarten.
Music break
Lean:
I was so fucking tired, of all that had to do with music, and all that shit.
Music break
Lean:
It went down like this. Barron, may his soul rest in peace, me and Benjamin and Hunter lived in an apartment that was owned by Barrons father, who’s a lawyer named Stephen Machat. Stephen was a lawyer for Ozzy Osborne, Nate Dogg and his father, Barrons grandfather, was the lawyer that cheated Leonard Cohen out of a lot of money. So it’s a lawyer family. I had started to go into psychosis, or like drug related psychosis or an overdose for some days and I wasn’t feeling any good. Barron and Hunter was out to buy some paper, paper and soda. And while that’s happening, at the same time that Barron crashes, I’m smashing this balcony without knowing what had happened. And Benjamin calls 911. I was not in the car with him and the car did not catch on fire either. He crashed into a tree. There are a lot of weird versions of that story. But I have also heard a lot of terrible things from family members and people around that were sure that I was the devil and that I had evil powers and all that. If you think about it, I was seventeen eighteen how the fuck can you put the blame on a seventeen year old. It was tough for me as well. But I have no magic powers. Unfortunately. If I had I would use them for good things.
Mats:
It was the father of the manager, Stephen, that accused you of being pure evil.
Lean:
I wonder why it was me that got that since he has worked with like Ozzy Osborne and have told stories about when Nate Dogg ran into his office with an AK-47.
Music break
Lean:
Yeah I wonder how I ended up being pure evil. But I guess there was something there, Swedish folklore with midsummer powers.
Mats:
The troll syndrome or something like that?
Lean:
Yeah haha, exactly, the big monster, Näcken (Water spirit) haha.
Mats:
But there is something provoking about it still right?
Lean:
When it is about peoples lives. I knew Barron, we were with each other every day. It is not fun to be called the Devil or pure evil when I was just seventeen and ended up at the psych ward. It’s about real peoples lifes. You can’t just call young people those things. And of course I understand that someone is scared and upset because their child died, but you can’t put the blame on people or call them things like that, it’s sick. But if it had been in a completely different scenario I would probably have been more proud of being called that. If it had to do with my music. But when it’s about real things it’s just scary.
Music break
Mats:
Yung Lean took drugs, dressed up as a nurse and wrote an unreadable book about his life. Everything got out of control around the making of the dark album Warlord. Where Sweden and Florida in songs like the Billy Bragg sampled song Miami Ultras. Yung Lean took an overdose, experienced psychosis and ended up at a mental hospital. At the same time he lost his American manager in a car accident. Barrons father, the well known show business lawyer with ambitions to reach the American senate put the blame on Yung Lean. He planned to release an unfinished version of Warlord. Back in Sweden, Sad Boys could see how a version of the album had leaked.
Lean:
Yeah shit I remember that. Yung Sherman was celebrating his birthday and we were out bowling, or maybe it was his old girlfriend who was celebrated and suddenly everyone was on their phone like shit, Stephen has released it all. Directly on band camp connected to his account. Unfinished versions of the songs, the song names were wrong. We had been working on that album since we got back home, it was all we had. Leaks can be the worst things. If you have been quiet for so long and so much has happened and you just want to release Warlord the right way, with the correct videos and artwork and then something like that happens. It’s like a fucking punch to your face. We lost a lot of hope that day.
Music break
Lean:
I think that the most crazy, for me, was a while ago, the had been at Fort Lauderdale at a large fair and I had bought a costume that was made for nurses and I wore that all the time. We were going to a hotel with an artist and he was buying weed from a stripper. And when we are at this hotel a man in there is arguing with the workers there and he has a large entourage and I recognise the voice. I’m like it’s Jim Jones, Jim Jones from dipset. I did not realise It by then but I had started living a little in my own world. I was begging to enter the psychosis. I was wearing the nurse outfit and took a picture with Jim Jones and we talk for a while. When I have looked at that picture years later I’ve been like what the fuck is this shit.
Music break
Lean:
Who was it, I think it was The Who, who met in a clothing store, and a guy was like you should make music. And then they made music. And it kinda felt that way, like yeah you guys should make this music.
Music break
Lean:
Sad rap, haha. Sad rap is quite a sickening term. It shouldn’t exist. We don’t make sad music. When you start going into the dark water you just want to go deeper and deeper. And you can only get back up when you are really hit by the waves. It was a mixture of destructivity, teenage anxiousness, and yeah, just how I felt back then.
Music break
Mats:
What for some appeared like a smart joke in the beginning, and for others like INAUDIBLE (he speaks danish accent Swedish) entertainment had in the middle of the 20th century attracted a dedicated fan base in the US. Something that no Swedish rapper had dreamt about. Yung Lean saw the opportunity to create surrealistic art and shabby rap. And history was written when Yung Lean was the first swede to enter the top 40 American R&B list. A list whose history goes back to Harlem Hit parade, 1942, where leaders like Louis Jordan and Lionel Hampton ruled. Yung Leans Unknown Memory entered at 36th place on the album list, right above Kanye West and under Migos. It was October 2014.
Lean:
It sounds like a lot of fun now that you say it but the most fun was just if the songs and the album were great for me, like it goes so far. Prices and stuff comes but it’s so temporary compared to creating it, what you have gone through to create the music.
Mats:
Yung Lean was a a part of the drug cult. The cough syrup drinking and pill popping that defined a depressed generation. Lil Peep with Swedish roots had just started building his emo vision, related (musically) to Yung Lean, and Juice WRLD stopped breathing after just a couple of albums.
Lean:
The death that affected me the most among those is a person that I didn’t know that well. But it was when I met Fredo Santana and we were in the studio. Me, Fredo, Axel and some of his boys. He was the kindest. We were listening to get rich or die trying and made a song together. He was a really good guy. And the day after I got a message that he was dead. It’s not more than that. In the US and in Sweden. I have friends that have died from benzodiazepines in Sweden as well. I think that it has a lot to do with, like lean, it goes hand in hand with the sales. Lean, Codeine. First Actavis, and then it gets so expensive and after a while completely banned. Then people start drinking red, and it costs like a thousand dollars a pint. You can’t pay that much unless you are a rapper. If you are a rapper you get special prizes. And then you want to get cheaper stuff, you want to take the same things as the rappers you look up to. I guess that once everything was very weird. Around 2013-2014, there was ILoveMakonnen there was, like mushrooms and that stuff. Before it was all opioid based with Percocets.
Music break
Lean:
It felt like, I don’t want to be that guy but, the music often gets very interesting when people are trying different stuff. I think that’s the sad reality. Maybe not with my music. I feel as I can create more when I’m sober. I have tried most of the drugs so if I feel I want to channel some type of drug I can go back in my memories to get the feeling if I want to sound a special way. If you think about like Young Thug when he made I came from nothing, you could hear he was all fucked up. You can’t do that sober. Gucci Mane is also an example. But now Gucci mane is also an example because now he’s skinny, he looks good, he has a great body, he has his wife, I wanna give him that. I don’t want him to be fat and have a codeine belly, be constipated and on the brink of dying all the time. I want him to look like he does now. I will sacrifice the music for that. His music is not good any more. But fuck that I can listen to the old songs. I’d rather have him healthy. And with Future as well. That he is afraid of going public with having quit lean because his fans wouldn’t trust him no more. That’s sad. But the music is explosive now. There is more hip hop being created now than ever before. It used to be kind of a mainstream genre with Lil Wayne and people thought it was a joke and the underground stuff was much cooler. But hip hop now, the biggest artists, it is the most experimental genre right now. It is more experimental than experimental indie pop. They use more drugs than those who do experimental jazz. It is weirder than punk. It is the weirdest there is right now. And people just have to live with that. That so many people die on the way doesn’t have to be a part of that. It could continue to be this special without people dying.
Music break
Lean:
Much of the trap you listened to in the beginning was like, more voices, almost choirs, Siberian choirs. Gucci Manes adlibs are louder than the main track. One of Chief Keefs biggest hits, Citgo, you can’t even hear the instrumental. There’s like six different layers of “smoking on the gas, gas citgo citgo”. It’s amazing. It’s weirder than anything else and I think I saw it from my own perspective. For me, all the elements of hip hop ant trap, and the clothing, has been art. And my way of expressing myself, minimalistic, if it’s with an iPhone camera or if I get to direct a whole video, it will always be done my way. It’s a mix of movies I’ve seen, experiences I’ve had, colours I think about that day. I think that this timing. Luck doesn’t exist to put it that way. If I am allowed to leave it at that. Haha.
Music break
Mats:
When you got back to Sweden from Florida. Your dad picked you up right?
Lean:
Yeah, I think both my parents were at the airport. You mean that my dad came to Florida and I walked around the mental hospital and I called my dad the king of California, because I didn’t recognise him. I just told him several times, “Are you the king of California?”. He became quite sad, but he has also been able to joke about it a lot now. There was one story that was quite scary actually. I kept saying that there was a doctor that was coming in and fucking things up for me. He was threatening me that I was gonna go to juvie and things like that, threatening me. And my dad asked me what the doctor looked like and I explained it to him. And he was like, that is not a doctor, it’s the guy who comes in to clean. He just came in to provoke me. And I was told that months later. It was quite scary. I have actually been at the psych ward in Sweden as well, much longer than in the US. 2017 I was at Danderyds (place outside of stockholm) closed section for a month. For psychosis as well, but not drug induced. But I have been sober now for two almost three years. I work out, I do boxing. I’m really happy and I’m more creative than ever. I think that everything that we’ve been talking about, me being a part of drug culture. Kids that say like, Yung Lean, I smoked my first joint for you, I took my first E for you. They would have done it to someone else’s music as well. I promise that. I’ve never pushed anyone to do drugs, I promise. I’ve just told it how it is, from my perspective. And you can do exactly the same thing and be sober as well. It is as much fun if not more fun. If I go out to club now, I can be out all night, I don’t get tired. I have much better relations now with everyone around me. I’m just a happier person. I think it’s much more fun for me to do this interview now compared to last time.
(They put in a clip from the interview they did way back)
Lean:
It sucks to be in school but that’s also a way to be down to earth and not feel so like I’m so fucking special, which I’m not. In a way it’s nice to be in school. Like, I’m no superstar. I have a normal life. It’s nice to live out my teenage life before something crazy happens.
Mats:
How old are you right now?
Lean:
I turn eighteen this summer.
(Back to the interview again)
I was at the Mount Sinai (Medical Centre) in Miami. And I found out Avicii was also there when I watched his documentary. And when at the hospital in Danderyd. It was very nice I must say. I was fucked up, completely manic, but it was a very nice place. Big up to the Swedish health care. That they put up with all the people there.
Music break.
Lean:
Those hours. All the people who are there, who try to break out, or try to commit suicide, or are screaming. You are laying there and you hear screams all night. It’s like being in a nightmare 24/7, plus that your own head is a nightmare 24/7. I had plans of escaping, I had a map of the hospital that I took a copy of and hid under my pillow. It was like One flew over the cuckoo's nest. You walk around there.
Mats:
Do you remember when you started making music after all this? The first attempts at getting back there musically.
Lean:
I was still a bit manic and when I was allowed to leave for some hours I chose to go to the studio. So I was driven to the studio from Danderyds hospital. I recorded six songs and then had to go back. When I finally left and was convalescent and quite low because of all the medication I just chose to never listen to those songs)
Music break (Lean starting singing I’d rather go blind by Etta James)
Lean:
I have no idea what I’m talking about there. I don’t really want to know. I just remember that I made a listen to your heart cover and I made a version of Etta James song because I had listened to that so much when I was at the hospital.
Music break (Lean continue to sing I’d rather go blind by Etta James)
Lean:
In the beginning you just try. You are like Bambi on the ice, trembling. But then I finished Stranger. We had made that album before I ended up at the hospital. Me and Micke finished it in the studio and then Whitearmor and I did our own tape. We went out to Mariefred where a guy named Pontus has a studio. He produced Britney Spears Toxic. And there we were making Poison Ivy. It felt very nice to just clear my head and the music turned out great. Those days were nice.
Music break
Mats: (talking about the upcoming album)
The adventure continues. The new album that follows up the anxiety filled milestone, Stranger, is punky millennium R&B, that can only be made by Yung Lean.
Lean:
It’s everywhere. Some of the songs are almost like ballads and some are more to the classical witch house, others sound like some, you know SVT Play (Swedish national TV) intro with piano haha, it’s everywhere. But I’m very inspired by The Stooges, I wanna be your dog. That song, and R&B.
Music break
Mats:
Jonathan spend the first time of his childhood in Belarus.
Lean:
You know you have some fake memories. You have a picture of an apartment. But I have one memory that I’ve been told so many times that It’s like I can see it. It’s when I was at kindergarten and my dad comes to pick me up. He asks for me and I’m not with the other kids. I had been bad so I was put in the corner with a large cone on my head. My dad walks over there and since he is Swedish he gets super mad and wanted me to quit going there. My mom was calmer and explained that that’s what they do, nothing weird about that, just some discipline. My mom is grown up in Soviet you know and went to a Russian school. Two different worlds. But I have lots of nice memories from there. I went to a school theatre and danced in snow and that stuff. I must have been a Pinocchio, somewhere around there I turned into a donkey. The cigar came. (Referring to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCBjfgXg8A4) I had a very nice childhood, middle class, Södermalm. My dad’s a writer, raised in Söder as well. My moms raised in Russia, she’s a real boss. She has had a crazy life. One time she told me that she was a cleaner at an embassy, and that one day she would be in those rooms. Now she is becoming an ambassador in Albania. She has worked her way up. I’m very proud of her. We lived in Söder. I have been to a lot of schools, Södermalmskolan, Gamla Maria, Katarina Norra, Kärrtorp…
Music break
Lean:
When I got back to Sweden from Belarus I started going to a kindergarten. It is one of my first memories. I was still speaking Russian and I so badly wanted to be understood. I walked around speaking in Russian Swedish, can I have milk and bread, can I have milk and bread. I really wanted to learn Swedish so I forbid my parents to speak Russian with me. That was very stupid, I really wish I hadn’t said that. I wish I had learnt Russian as well. Music came into my life early. It was what made my life fun. It was always my thing and what I was good at. I think I said that last time we talked. When I was young I got a little bit famous with a song called Söder Söder. I was opening for Adam Tensta (Swedish rapper) when I was in fourth grade. Then I made a mixtape with a friend during a summer, and I made a lot of music with my sister. I dressed up and put on makeup. Went to school and listened to Green Day. You know, you wanted to, I basically dressed up the way I do today. I did the same thing back then as I do now. The only difference is that I make money now.
I think that they were worried a lot. I guess the drug aspect of it. When you get so interested in things, those things comes with it. When I was I seventh grade I was caught with some weed, petty shit, and yeah they were worried about all that. But in the end they have been very proud and they will come tonight to my show. They have been to so many of my shows and they are very proud. If I make a good song I want to show it to my mom. If she likes it then it will be released. Same with my dad. I don’t know if they understood if they that there was always something extra or something special that I wanted to do. I guess you will have to ask them about that. But I know that they are proud.
Music break
Lean:
I think it’s so much fun. That I’m Swedish and that there are not that many Swedes that like me. I means that I’ve made it. I remember when I went out to eat with my mom, she had got us Indian food, I told her that I had gotten a gig in Gothenburg. And she asked like for who, for yourself or what? She was just laughing at me. I had to convince her, showing the event. And she asked like, Yung Lean, is that you? And I showed her videos and she still didn’t get it. I finally had to call Emilio on speaker and have him explain it to her. My dad didn’t get any of it either. It was quite tough because someone had written an article where it said that I was the son of Kristoffer Leandoer, the horror writer. He was so mad, I came home from school and he was furious. He was like “What’s all this? My name, and this song, greygoose?”. But afterwards when he understood it he was proud. But no one ever understood how big it was. I was at my room all the time. We remade the basement into a small studio and I was always there. I was smart with that shit. I got like Lofty 305 and people from Miami and small underground people that I kept sending my songs to. I just sat home and we had this Tumblr that Axel created and we were like dolphins, we communicated directly to the fans, even if I had like 3 fans, and suddenly I had ten thousand fans, and we still communicated directly to them. They got to know all about us. They knew exactly what we were doing.
Music break
(Again a clip from the older interview when Lean was seventeen)
Lean:
I do not claim that I do all the things I sing about in my songs. I’ve never said that. That would be completely crazy. I wouldn’t be a good seventeen year old then. It would be insane. But I guess you should believe that Yung Lean doesn’t exist. That he is just some fucking seventeen year old that’s completely crazy, and then the real me comes in and say things and have real emotions and real lyrics. I guess the mix between those things are Yung Lean, that’s what Sad boys are. The mix of what’s real and what’s not. That’s what the listeners have to think about themselves, and decide what they want to believe and now. And what they like, is it the music or the person.
Mats:
And it is when you balance that where everything becomes interesting.
Lean:
It’s exactly that. And it’s so nice because you get to do that, while really you are not allowed to do it, it’s completely wrong, but if you really want to do it, do it, and then you do it. Everything that’s written should have to be thought of several times, nothing should be just straight forward. I get it, that’s good, now I won’t listen to it again. That’s no good. If it’s an album or a song where you get everything there’s no fun in it. It’s like watching a bad film. You want to see something that leaves an impression. It’s much more fun that people talk about me. Rather than that they just say like he’s such a good rapper. It’s not like I’m trying to be a weird rapper, I guess that what I feel like doing, that’s real. I make things from myself. I don’t rap about these crazy things because I want to be like that or because I want to build up an image. I do it because it’s what I feel like doing. I do it because it’s what I want.
Music break
(Back to the new interview again)
Lean:
I remember Charlie XCX saying that her and Robyn had been in the studio and she had shown her Ginseng strip and they had been like turn it off, turn it off. They hated it. And then some days passed and both of them had listened to it by themselves. And when they came back to the studio the just kept on listening to it. It’s like you have to hate it at first. It’s so provocative. Like he looks this way, or it’s so honest, or it’s just something. It’s too close, or I don’t know. Like it’s still a meme on all my YouTube videos. Listened first time, hated it, listened tenth time, my favourite song. It’s the Yung Lean effect.
Music break
Lean:
I would love to make film when I get older. I would like to make film of greek tales. There is a tale of a man called Geryon, he is completely red and has a red dog and lives on a red island. He is killed by Hercules. I would like to make a film about that but more of a psychological thriller. Kinda like pusher, Snabba Cash (Swedish movie) meets Greek mythology.
Mats:
You have the John Ausonius (Swedish serial killer) project, you are drawn to darkness.
Lean:
Yeah, yes I do. It’s natural and not at all an image. I remember my dad joking about that when I was small. I always wanted the orchs to win in the lord of the rings, and that Voldemort was much cooler than Harry Potter. I think it’s quite simple psychology really. That it’s just more interesting. If I had a history of real darkness. Like growing up in war or torture. I think I would be very interested in happy stuff. But now I am not. You are attracted to what you are not from, where you don’t think you belong. But where I am is where I belong the best. I am privileged where I do not belong any more. I think everyone wants to find a world where they don’t naturally belong. For me that has been music. No one in my family had anything to do with music. No one has been a rapper. I have always felt at home in front on a microphone.
Mats:
When you found the darkness in Florida and managed to get out of it, was it mission completed?
Lean:
I don’t know if it was mission completed really. Barron died so I would want to take back a lot of what happened there. I think I had the darkness within me before that. It is inside of you.
submitted by RYGGSK0TT to sadboys [link] [comments]

Madison Square Garden - A Comprehensive History

Since there was a lot of positive response to my comment on the KD thread about The Garden, I floated the idea of a thread, and you all asked for it, so here it is! Here at reddit, there can be a lot of LOL this (Knicks) and LOL that (Knicks again), and while MSG certainly has its own shortcomings to say the least, there is a true story to be told about the buildings and how it came to be where it is today.
Known as ‘The Worlds Most Famous Arena’, MSG played a direct roll in making sports in America what it is today, and while many people criticize the current incarnation of the building, most people don’t know the full story - or that the current one is actually the 4th version (and 3rd location) of the building. The college basketball history at MSG, which I won’t give away yet, is one of if not THE main reason we have our beloved NBA and professional basketball in general today. This is going to be a very long read, like, very very long. But I’m going to try and throw all the really juicy facts in there that I picked up along my years of research from working in the tour department. I thought of splitting it up, but I wanted this post to be a comprehensive history of The World’s Most Famous Arena!
If you’re only concerned with the history of the joint once basketball enters into the picture, skip to MSG III.
If you want the juicy details on the controversy of tearing down old Penn Station then skip to MSG IIII.
If you have any questions on anything or want me to elaborate on anything that I only mention briefly, please feel free to ask! MSG’s history is full of not only amazing moments, but vengeful murders, and a whole lot of sketchy stuff. This is the story of how a small train station on the north east corner of Madison Square Park eventually led to the demolition of an iconic NYC train station some 100 years later. It’s not on Madison Avenue, it’s not square, and it’s not a garden, but there is a good reason for all of this - or at least a good explanation - I promise!
MADISON SQUARE GARDEN I
Ironically, just how this story’s climax involves tearing an iconic train station down to build the current arena, the beginning starts in much the same way. Just with a significantly less iconic train station. In the mid 1800’s there was a small railroad depot on the north east corner of Madison Square Park, occupied by New York and Harlem Railroad on East 26th street and Madison Ave and owned by Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. For those of you not familiar with the city (yes, we call it ‘the city’) that location is pretty central and throughout time has had a lot of important events happen there, which is a thread for another time. The park was named for president James Madison, just like the street, which was very common at the time. People loved that guy.
The railroad opened up another location you may have heard of, by the name of ‘Grand Central Station’ in 1871, therefor leaving the smaller rail depot on 26th street abandoned. After a few vacant years, the building was leased to PT Barnum, who converted it into what he called the ‘Great Roman Hippodrome’. This place was a big open air oval ‘arena’ where he did exactly what you’d expect. Circuses etc. What happens next is where things start getting interesting.
Then the building was leased to a band leader named Patrick Gilmore. Some historians in that field feel like Gilmore is a forgotten guy compared to the likes of John Phillips Sousa, who is really the only person we common modern folk recognize in terms of old timey band leaders. But Gilmore was a very important figure of his day. Gilmore purchased the building and…wait for it…called it Gilmore’s Concert GARDEN. ‘Garden’ was a semi-popular add on to entertainment centers in NY during that era, starting with what I can tell from my research when Castle Clinton (aka, the old fort turned venue turned place you buy your tickets to go out to the Statue of Liberty now) was converted into a venue called Castle garden in the 1820s.
The other notable contributions Gilmore made to The Garden are holding the first Westminster Kennel Club dog show, the longest running garden event obviously still held there today, and even doing the first boxing matches there. I always found this bit fascinating, because boxing matches were technically illegal at the time. He called them ‘illustrated lectures’ and as any good New Yorker trying to make a buck does, found a way around the rules and got away with it. This is a common theme within the history of The Garden as you will see.
The arena changed hands a few more times, first to an administrator with the dog show, who also started to do more sporty things like tennis and installing one of the first ‘indoor’ ice rinks in the US.
The building went back into Vanderbilt control when Commodore died, by his grandson William Vanderbilt. He was the one who decided, the ‘garden’ part was cool, but since it wasn’t leased by Gilmore anymore, he would rename it after the park which it shared a border. Hence the name, Madison Square Garden. He expanded the range of events that were held there including adding bicycle racing. This would be by far the most widely beloved event held at the Garden, including a long running race called ‘Six Days of New York’ where an insane SIX day bike race would be held. These were basically just endurance contests, with a single bicyclist doing as many laps as possible, they could sleep whenever and join back in whenever. This was all the rage, but also dangerous for not only the participants but the spectators. People who wanted to soak up all the action were easy targets for crooks who were also in attendance. These events were so popular nationwide however, that there is even a bicycle discipline called ‘Madison’ named after the OG garden.
The building however ran its course, because of its lack of roof and decaying infrastructure.
What I mean by decaying can probably best be summed up by the disaster which many people now a days don’t know of, when part of the building collapsed falling outward into the street and some of the roof also caving in with 800 people inside. Apparently it was chaos, and 20 something people were killed or injured. It’s pretty brutal, and if you want to know more about that incident you can read the newspaper article from the time here.
Vanderbilt sold the spot to who's who collection of rich white men. JP Morgan, Carnegie, Astor etc. So they decided to tear it down and build a new extremely extravagant arena on the same spot. They got renowned architect Stanford White (more on him later) and they demolished the building in 1889. After spending more than half a million dollars, MSG II was built.
Madison Square Garden II
By this point, MSG was still not the household name it would become in the future. This building was supposed to change that narrative, which is why these rich guys went all in on it. You’ll see, that they were maybe in over their heads. However, this might be the most fascinating of all the MSGs for several reasons.
Firstly, the building was extremely extravagant. That can not be overstated. I would encourage you all to just google pictures of the building, it was massive and you’ll see all the features I’m describing here. It featured a huge 32 story tall bell tower, which was good for the 2nd tallest building in the city at the time. The bellower was topped by a sculpture of the goddess Diana the huntress, which was sculpted by famous artist Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and was gilt in copper. They moved the statue not soon after, and you can see it today at the Philly Museum of art! It spun around in the wind, and their original brilliant idea was to have an actual cloth scarf draped on it, but since wind exists, it got blown away not too long after its installation.
Its main hall was the largest in the world. It had not only the main hall which sat 8,000 but just like today’s garden, had a small theater which sat 1200, and even another concert hall which sat 1500. Of course they also had the largest restaurant in the city, because why not. And because it is ‘The Garden’ they decided there should be a roof garden cabaret. They thought this would be a landmark the likes of central park, and it was certainly grandiose enough. They had the same kind of events that the first garden did, including sports, concerts, and all the random stuff they found fun before the invention of TV (not to mention radio, or at least the widespread broadcast of radio). But the problem was, the building was so damn extra, that they had a hard time making enough money to upkeep the place.
Now let’s talk about the architect. Stanford White is probably best remembered for designing the Triumphal arch in Washington square, but then closely followed by being murdered in his own building, MSG II, in a lovers quarrel. This was huge news at the time, and so was the trial that ensued, they called it ‘The Trial of The Century’. The building, being as ridiculous as it was, of course housed an apartment for White, and millionaire Harry Kendall Thaw was not too happy with White who apparently had an affair with his actress wife when she was 16. So he came through, and shot him dead in his own building. It’s all incredibly sketchy and simultaneously intriguing, involving major names of the day, which is probably why the trial was so juicy and gripping in the eyes of the general public.
Anyways, the building was ultimately a failure, and didn’t last very long in retrospect. Everyone knew what Madison Square Garden was, and it was a landmark from 1890-1926, but the building failed to live up to expectations, much less make money. A 36 year run is really nothing to write home about, especially with the illusions (or better yet delusions) of grandeur its rich owners had in mind. There were some important sporting events that happened there, but what would happen in the next building would be the reason The Garden is now known as, The Worlds most Famous Arena. Interestingly the building there today, the New York Life Insurance Company, was built on that plot directly after MSG II was demolished. They owned the mortgage on the building, so they just built their headquarters there. It’s an iconic building in its own right, and if you’re on the NE corner of the park, there’s a plaque on the building which notes that it was the location of the first 2 Gardens.
The only thing MSG still had was, well, the name. And in walked Tex Rickard, to seize an opportunity that proved to be golden.
Madison Square Garden III
If you’ve never heard of Tex Rickard, think PT Barnum, Don King, etc. He was the leading boxing (and more) promoter of the day, and was a very successful businessman, operating saloons, hotels, casinos, and the like. He was a country boy, born in Missouri and raised in Texas, but had a knack for business and promotion. Tex saw the opportunity to buy the name, and incorporated the ‘New Madison Square Garden Corporation’ in 1923. It was smart, although MSG II didn't make money, it was still a household name in NYC. The purpose was to build a less extravagant arena, but a place that would be iconic in its own right and host major sporting events, including NHL games. This is where MSG started to make a name for itself as a major player in venues, and eventually THE most famous arena in the world. So Tex bought a big block of land quite a bit of a ways away from the original site of The Garden, on 8th avenue between 49th and 50th street. He basically built a big box, designed by theater architect Thomas Lamb, at the cost of almost 5 million dollars and in a remarkable 249 days. I think it’s sufficient to say that ol’ Tex knew how to get things done. He had a bunch of rich backers, plenty of clout, and he threw his arena up in sharp contrast to the old garden. It did however have a very iconic marquee, and if you talk to anyone who was around at the time they will note that the marquee was the distinguishing feature of the building. The main draw originally was boxing, as that was Tex’s bag. They had major fights, and drew much larger crowds than the older gardens, mostly because they could cram almost 20,000 people in there. The site lines were apparently terrible, but by all accounts the energy that still haunts the current garden, was the main draw.
Then, hockey happened. This was the idea from the start, as fellow sports promoter Thomas Duggan had options on three expansion teams for the NHL, to be established in the US. One became the Bruins, and then one was arranged to be given to NYC’s most-celebrated prohibition bootlegger Bill Dwyer, who arranged with Tex to have the team play at MSG III. Tex had an agreement with the first team they started, The New York Americans, aka The Amerks (ever heard of them?), that they would be the only hockey team to ever play at The Garden. Although there was a clause in the contract that Tex claimed he would never exercise, that claimed if Tex and MSG ever made a bid for a team, the Amerks would support it. Tex kept his word for approximately one year, when due to the American’s success, he went out and got himself a hockey team. The tabloids dubbed this team Tex’s Rangers, an obvious play on words, and you can guess what that team that became today. The Rangers soon eclipsed the Amerks in success, and The Garden’s lore began to grow as the place to be in NYC.
One more note on Tex, and maybe the most important in my biased Knicks ‘no other arena is THE GARDEN’ mind. he started 7 other Madison Square Garden’s around the country. Including ‘Boston Madison Square Garden’ which as you may guess, became known as Boston Garden. Thats right Celtics fans, your building was named after ours. Thanks Tex, for unknowingly providing another iconic building, that the future inhabitants of your NYC building would lose in over and over again! Anyways…now is where basketball becomes the star - so you can all start paying attention!
At the time, nobody thought professional basketball was a viable way of making money. Rickard passed away in 1929, and during the great depression things stayed somewhat status quo, but also there were now a lot of days where the giant arena wasn’t being used at all. Then, in walked Ned Irish, a successful sports journalist who quit his job covering basketball games for the World-Telegram, to start promoting basketball games at MSG III. The Garden let him promote and hold games there, as long as he would just cover the rent, that’s how bad things were economically. To everyone’s pleasant surprise, the college games became a lot more financially successful than anyone had anticipated. Along with making money, these college games were probably the number one factor in growing the game nationwide in general. College ball became the marquee (pun intended) event at MSG III, especially the double headers. This was a time, before the infamous point shaving scandals, that NYC college basketball was a force in the college game. It’s hard to believe now, but teams like NYU and CCNY were the equivalent of today’s Duke and UNC. By 1946, they were selling out the arena, and the city (and country) had fallen in love with the game of basketball. The NIT was started during this time, and even the first televised basketball game happened there in the form of a Fordham-Pitt / Georgetown-NYU doubleheader. The previously mentioned point shaving scandal involving the NYC schools hamstrung Irish’s ability to put on marquee matchups at MSG III, as a lot of the major teams were banned from playing there, and the NCAA reduced its use of the arena as a result.
Ned, being the promoter genius that he was, saw the success of the college game, knew his limitations with that now, and thought…Why can’t we do this with professional athletes and start a league? There had technically been professional basketball being played at MSG III since its inception, but it was traveling teams like the original Celtics, which weren’t associated with a league. People just didn’t think there was enough money in it, or a means and arenas to have such a league. So with other owners of hockey arenas around the US (and Canada!) They started the NBA in 1946. It wasn’t instantly as popular as the college game as you may suspect, with the Knicks even having to play at the 69th (nice) regiment armory when a college game was on that took priority over the NBA. Ironically, the armory was a few blocks away from the original location of MSG I and II, on Lexington between 25th and 26th, it’s still there for those NYers who happen to walk by and notice the building.
There were other major nationally news worth events that happened at MSG III, including a host of politically themed ventures including both a packed Nazi rally (really, and people were NOT happy about it as you may imagine) and an anti-nazi rally. There are some very famous photos and press about the pro Nazi rally, which happened in 1939 and was organized by the ‘German American Bund’. As Nazi's were wont to do, they recorded the thing, and for what it's worth, its some of the best and most crisp footage of the old garden although the Nazi's really spoil it - Here are the receipts. If only they put their efforts into making beautiful videos of basketball games instead of hate. Too bad the guy who charged the stage didn't do any damage, and I hate to think of what they did to him. Anyways before I get too riled up, a few years later this group would be banned, but MSG certainly took some heat for allowing this to go down, and deservedly so. The tradition of MSG doing anything for a buck holds strong!
Probably the most noteworthy event ever held in that venue was also somewhat a political event. The most famous version of ‘Happy Birthday’ ever sung took place at JFK’s birthday party, sung of course by Marilyn Monroe, at MSG III. Most people probably had no idea where this took place, and it may be realistically the most famous moment from any of the incarnations of MSG.
Another one of my favorite stories from that time is when they had first built MSG III there was a boxer, who’s name escapes me but this is the NBA sub so you all don’t care, that didn’t realize there was a new venue, so he showed up at the site of MSG II only to see that it had been demolished. He scooted uptown as quickly as he could, and won his fight. There is a whole host of boxing history that went down there, but I won’t bore you all with the details, just go look it up if you’re interested! The boxing events most of you have heard of, such as The Fight of the Century, would happen at the building that stands today, MSG IIII.
Now, on to the controversy.
Madison Square Garden IIII (current arena)
This is all just fact, and I won’t get into my biased opinion on why or why not this was the right thing to do. I’m going to lay out the full controversy before I get into some fun facts about the current arena…So here goes…
Yes, there was an above ground Penn Station. It was thought of as one of the most iconic and beautiful landmarks in NYC. Look up some pictures, it’s very cool.
In 1959, Graham-Paige bought a 40% stake in MSG for $4 million. Then, in 1960, Graham-Paige president Irving Felt (old NYers will recognize the name, the Felt Forum, which was the original name for the theater under the arena floor) bought the right to Penn Station. The idea was always that he would tear the old station down, and build the sports complex. The Pennsylvania Railroad company sold the air rights to the property because passenger traffic was on the decline after WW2, and they weren’t making enough money to upkeep the station. I’m sure the Penn Railroad company wasn’t too keen on tearing the building down, but Felt made them an offer they couldn’t refuse. In exchange for the rights of a building they couldn’t support anymore, the Penn Railroad company got a brand new, smaller station completely below the street at no cost, and also a 25% stake in the new MSG complex. That probably worked out ok for them. People tried to save the old station, as it was a beautiful and a lot of people were outraged that the city would let this happen. At the end of the day, the city voted to demolish the building in 1963. A lot went into this, it was simply too much for the railroad company to upkeep, and like I said, they got a pretty great offer. Also, they had at first optioned the air rights to William Zeckendorf in 1954, and he had some plans which would reconfigure the train station into several different things including a ‘world trade center’ and a ‘Palace of Progress’. These things didn’t come to pass, again, this was a MASSIVE building. Now it should be noted, if NYC wanted to save the building, they could have saved the building. It would not have been cheap, but they could have done it. However the city thought that since it was originally intended to be a ‘cost-effective and functional piece of the city’s infrastructure’ it was now mostly just a ‘monument to the past’. Pretty cold, but the city had a history of destroying historic buildings to build even more historic ones. A lot of the criticism from people after MSG4 was built, was that this was not the case in this instance, as opposed to say - tearing down the original Waldorf-Astoria to put up the Empire State Building. That one in retrospect, doesn’t have as much contention. The city thought they were being ‘progressive’ and from what I can gather, people didn’t believe they were actually going to tear the building down until they actually started doing it. When they actually started tearing it down, it sparked international outrage. As another user pointed out on the other thread, this led to the establishment of the NYC landmarks preservation commission, which did in fact save Grand Central from demolition in 1968. So that’s a silver lining to all of this. NYC didn’t step up to save the old Penn Station, but its demolition was not in vain. The outrage that it caused has surely saved plenty of other historic buildings from their demise. Like I said, I’m not trying to say it was right or wrong, this post is simply to state the facts on what happened and why it all happened.
(((I realize that I may have been typing hastily and drunk when I responded with why the old landmark Penn Station building was torn down for the new MSG. Admittedly, my timeline was slightly off, as the ‘no property tax’ thing happened afterwards to keep the Knicks / Rangers / MSG in the city. I went back into my research and wanted to make sure I explained what happened 100% accurately. Even though nobody disputed this in the thread, my post may have been confusing and the timeline in my head was a bit skewed, as I said the threat of moving to NJ was a factor in them originally tearing the train station down. This was the reason for the property tax cut, but not the original demo of the train station, as you've just read. I wanted to make sure the accurate story was told. So this should clear up the timeline, and why and when things happened the way they did.)))
The next big controversy is what I had a little mixed up in my original post, as I clumped it together with the original controversy, and that is the threat of the teams moving to New Jersey. This did happen and this is where it gets very, very, VERY sketchy.
In 1982, when Gulf and Western owned MSG, they threatened to move the teams to NJ, as the Giants and Jets had done, and also the Devils although they didn’t come from Manhattan. NJ had proven a more than viable option for professional sports teams, as it was just a short train ride away to the new Meadowlands Sports Complex. The Garden was in need of renovation, so they made then mayor Ed Koch an ultimatum - give us a tax break to help us renovate the arena and add the new fangled luxury boxes that all the newer arenas had. That led to a full property tax exemption for the next 10 years.
Koch ‘didn’t realize’ that no one put in a sunset date for the tax exemption. Some think he confused the clause that stated the teams would be locked in for at least 10 more years, for a clause that said the tax exemption would only last for 10 more years. The first part of that is true, so interestingly enough the Knicks and Rangers are not allowed to play home games anywhere else but MSG, or they would break the agreement, so things like the NHL winter classic that the Rangers play in, even if in NY they have to be the away team. Knicks in London? Away team. Not that those teams would give up a home games worth of revenue, but still they technically have to be the away team. So the garden has saved somewhere around half a billion dollars, yes BILLION dollars in property tax payments. It’s around $50 Million now, and although there have been bills, most notably in 2014 to try and get this changed, so far it’s fallen on deaf ears.
The argument against this is pretty plain to see, the Knicks and the Rangers are the most profitable teams in their respective sports, and that they don’t need this tax break. Let’s make one thing clear, Jim Dolan definitely does NOT need the tax break. Everyone has to pay property taxes. Except, Dolan and MSG. It’s a hard pill to swallow, even as the most diehard Knicks fan. The City Council almost unanimously voted to take it to state legislature in 2014, which has authority over the cities tax rules. There is sketchy stuff all through this, like state assembly leader at the time Sheldon Silver having his daughter and one of his former top aides on MSG payroll. Oh yeah, Sheldon Silver was convicted of federal fraud and extortion charges sometime after that focused on large payments that Silver received for years from Goldberg & Iryami, a law firm that specialized in seeking reductions of New York City real estate taxes for real estate developers. Silver was alleged to have persuaded developers who had business with the state to use the firm, which in turn generated $700,000 in referral fees to Silver. Totally not sketchy at all.
Here’s where it stands today, as controversy will be back to a fever pitch in a few years.
In 2013, the NYC council voted unanimously to give MSG a ten year permit, as opposed to their current agreement which gave them operating rights in perpetuity. This means that MSG’s operating permit is up in 2023. Penn Station is in dire need of renovation. Like, more-so than the Knicks are in need of talent. Dolan also spent a couple billion on renovating the arena into the state of the art facility it is today. He’s not planning on moving it. If the city wants Dolan to move the garden so they can renovate the station, it would be massively complicated, and the city would be forced to offer huge subsidies to get MSG out of the way. So chances are, everything goes on, status quo. Now I will say, from my time receiving internal emails at MSG, Dolan does not want a fight with the city. They realize that there can potentially be a compromise here. Also, he has a ton of money, and politicians tend to respond to that.
One thing that is a step in the right direction, is the massive building across 8th avenue, the iconic post office, which just like the old Penn Station has gone largely unused but BECAUSE of Penn Stations demolition has been protected itself from demolition. It has already begun to be repurposed for the train station, and by 2021 they are supposed to finish the construction on the inside to a huge, new, modern train hub. This will do a lot honestly in reducing the congestion in the old underground station.
The other internal rumblings, were that Dolan was going to let them build into the theater. Cuomo actually announced this plan, which would leave the arena intact. I will explain the layout of the current building later, but underneath the arena floor up on the 5th floor, sits the 2nd largest theater in all of NYC. In my time there it was being used less and less, mostly because the garden also owns Radio City and The Beacon theater, which are much nicer venues. There have been iconic events down in the theater also, including many NBA drafts, and some epic Eddie Murphy stand up specials, but it is in need of renovation. It is the only area that they didn’t touch during the renovation, because the thought process is that they’d just be competing with themselves in Radio and The Beacon. So The idea is that Dolan will throw the city a bone, and let them build up into the theater, in exchange for keeping the status quo, which would give Penn a much larger footprint. Admittedly, I’m not sure what progress has gone into this plan, and if the Amtrak plan for the post office has changed any of that. Basically, we’re just going to have to wait until 2023 to see what the future really holds for MSG, but knowing a bit about NYC politics, I wouldn’t count on anything changing.
Ok, now that that’s all out of the way, lets talk about the fun side of MSG4, if it hasn’t already left too sour of a taste in your collective mouths.
The new building is actually a pretty fascinating piece of architecture in its own right. Some people think the facade is ugly, and that’s fair, but the inner workings are pretty cool. Charles Luckman was the architect, and he also designed the Forum out in LA, owned now by MSG as well. In my opinion, the most fascinating part of the structure is the cable system which supports it. 48 cables connect from the outer circumference of the building, meeting at the middle in a center tension ring. This allows the arena to not have visual support beams, like the arenas before it all boasted. No visual beams means better sight lines, and less obstructions. This is a cool article from the time about it if you care to know more about the actual construction. If you’re ever at The Garden, look for little circular plaques on the wall, numbered 1-48. These mark where the cables line up in the arena, and security can actually use these to dictate where they are in the building. You’ll probably never notice them, unless you’re looking for them.
The other cool thing about the roof, is that if you look closely you’ll see that the actual ceiling which sits between the cables, you’ll see that it has tiny holes all through it. Thats because the ceiling is designed to absorb sound, its filled with sound absorption material so when the sound passes through the holes it helps deaden the room. Usually arenas are the worst place to see a concert, and the general rule of thumb is - the bigger the room, the louder and boomier it will be. It’s certainly not as good sounding as a smaller concert venue but it is better than any arena you’ll find. As opposed to oracle arena, which has a concrete ceiling meant to amplify sound for sporting events etc. Which makes it even more impressive how loud it gets in there, despite the ceilings best efforts.
When the building was built there was a 48 lane bowling alley, an art gallery, a hall of fame, and a 501 seat cinema. Thats right, a 48 lane bowling alley. It closed in the 80s, but had a lot of bowling events including some sort of bowling TV show apparently. I haven’t been able to confirm this, but this was what I was told by a reliable source! Someone older than myself can probably speak to that.
Unlike most arenas, the arena floor of MSG is actually 5 floors above street level, which allows for the theater underneath the arena floor.
Although the Felt Forum Theater at Madison Square Garden doesn’t have as many events as it used to, they still have events and even at the same time that there are events going on up in the main arena. When I was working there, we had plenty of instances where there were crazy concerts or games going on upstairs, and other events going on in the theater. You would have never known the other was going on, and there is no sound transmitted from one venue to the other. Also if you’re familiar with the theater, the rumor is the lights (probably its defining characteristic) that pattern the theater ceiling, equates exactly to the number of seats in the theater. I never was bored enough to count, so that’ll just have to be a rumor for now!
The floor of the arena itself is pretty cool, and if you’re not familiar with how these multi-sport arenas work, the ice lives underneath the court all through hockey and basketball season. It’s pretty remarkable to watch the ice crew make the ice, and pretty sad when it gets melted. The fun fact here is, not only can they switch over in under 3 hours from one sport to the other, but they WILL do it and have to do it several times a year to do a Knicks and Rangers home game on the same day. All four sides of the arena have expandable seating, think high school gym, which allows for almost 2 thousand more seats during Knicks games as opposed to rangers games. They cover the ice with a fiberglass/plastic compound material, and then the floor fits together like a giant puzzle over top of the material. This current material has been used since the renovation, and the ridiculous thing is before the new material, supposedly they had to melt the ice once during the season - to accommodate for the longest running event in MSG history, the dog show. Apparently the dogs could sense the ice! I wasn’t there at that time, but that was what I was told was the scenario.
Another ridiculous thing is seeing them set up for professional bull riding. It’s insane, they bring in literally 20 something dump trucks of dirt and they do a ‘running of the bulls’ where all the bulls run up the ramp that goes to the street, and into their pens. It’s probably the wildest thing you’ll see being set up there, and also leaves the arena smelling like, well, you know, for several weeks. Not as bad as it smells after Phish comes through for NYE, and no I’m not talking about reefer. That would be one thing, but it just smells…grimy.
As much as we all collectively have some disdain for James Dolan, it hasn’t been all bad. He has hosted 3 of the biggest benifit concerts of all time, for 9/11, Katrina, and Sandy. All the proceeds from these shows went towards victim relief. But what people don’t realize is that the first ever benefit concert happened at MSG, in George Harrison’s ‘The Concert For Bangladesh’.
As for the new renovation, they really did a nice job in a lot of ways. It took 3 years, from 2011-13. First of all, if you’ve never sat on the bridge for a game, do it. It’s truly a one of a kind view. If you’re not familiar with the bridge, they are 2 suspended walkways that were added during the renovation, with several rows of seating that stretch across the arena. One side is the ‘Media bridge’ where there are TV’s with full cable, all kinds of plugs for laptops and internet and all that. They will sell tickets to this side when it’s a game that the media isn’t hogging the whole thing. I like hanging up there during games because there are advanced stats on some of the channels, anything you would need to be covering the game from a journalistic perspective, so it’s pretty cool. Also that’s where the radio, and the hockey TV broadcast booths are, since the vantage point is better up there for hockey than on the glass.
Pro tip - sometimes on stub hub or wherever, those seats can be cheaper than the ones further back not on the bridge. This is because they’re the ‘300’ level, where as the seats all the way up on the sides are the 200 level. However there really isn’t a bad seat in the house. And there are bars INSIDE the seating area, so if you’re up in the top of the 200’s, you can hit the bar without ever leaving the arena bowl and missing a single second of that can’t miss Knicks basketball. The 400 level is cool too, that’s the blue seats, which were the original color of all the 400 level seats.
Back in the day, when there were paper tickets, the seats in the different levels were different colors, and the tickets for those seats would be the same color as your seats!
The suite situation is very insane now a days. There are the event level suites, which are 20 suites located literally on the arena floor, underneath the seating. They have no view of the game, but they come with 8 seats each right in the first few rows. It’s the best of both worlds, so you’ll see the first few rows CLEAR OUT during half time to go into their little luxury caves. There are also suites all through the mid level of the arena, and then a 3rd level of suites up on the 9th floor, facing the stage.
There are also luxury clubs, including the Delta Club, which if you’ve never had a ticket with access to it, and can afford it - I highly recommend it. Everything (minus alcohol of course!) is free, and the food is honestly ridiculous. Further down the hall and down the stairs is the JP Morgan club (throwback!) where an even more elite club (closest 100 or so seats) can hang out. And even more so, there is a place called ‘suite 200’. I never knew about this until I worked there. You can only go there if you’re invited, which means you’re very famous. For some reason, my keycard had access to this, and I explored it a few times. It’s ridiculous. Original trophies, huge original paintings, etc.
Speaking of trophies - everyone used to ask me where the Knicks championship trophies are - and the truth is, back when the Knicks won it was so long ago, that the NBA trophy was like the Stanley cup and changed hands every year. So…no Knicks championship trophies. However if you go to MSG you’ll notice the defining moments collection, the top moments in MSG history that line the walls of the 2 main concourses. There is one dedicated to the 1970 championship, and it has the eastern conference trophy in it. Now this I can confirm is true - if you examine the trophy you’ll notice that the little basketball player on top is a different hue than the rest of the trophy. That’s because apparently when they were compiling these displays a few years ago, they found the trophy in storage with the basketball man broken off the top of it, so they had to replace it. That’s why you can visibly tell that there is a difference between him and the rest of the trophy, if you really examine it.
Obviously there have been so many huge events at The Garden, I don’t really need to get into that here.
Also if you ever get the chance, visit the 9th floor where the signature suites are located. The coolest memorabilia in the building is up there, including one of those signed 50 greatest lithographs, Patrick Ewing and Wayne Gretzky’s locker, and even the statue of Joe Gans, a legendary African American boxer. This statue has the patina pretty much gone from his outstretched left arm is it was tradition for boxers to tap gloves with Joe for good luck before they took the ring. Now it sits up there, right next to the scale that was in use during the time of the fight of the century featuring Frazier and Ali. They also have an old school ice resurfacer up there, which is pretty cool.
Well, I’m sure there’s a ton that I left out - If you made it this far, you’re a champ.
TL;DR - Boston Garden was originally called Boston Madison Square Garden and was named after the arena in NY. There is only one 'The Garden' and it's super duper important. ;)
Edit - I should have mentioned wrestling. It’s intimately tied to MSG, but really deserves its own thread and I have no more characters!
submitted by JiveChain to nba [link] [comments]

HARLEM SHAKE - CASINO DE ST BREVIN L'OCEAN Harlem Shake! Thunder Valley Casino Resort Version ... Harlem Nights Casino #003 - YouTube Club Harlem Casino History! Reno NV  1948-1968 - YouTube

Browse 129 harlem casino stock photos and images available, or start a new search to explore more stock photos and images. Explore {{searchView.params.phrase}} by color family {{familyColorButtonText(colorFamily.name)}} View of the exterior of The Renaissance Ballroom an Casino located at 138th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem circa 1925 in New York City, New York. man smoking cigar at card ... Renaissance Ballroom and Casino Central Harlem. explore visiting favorite add to favorites. In the late 19th and early 20th century, all over America, low rise entertainment complexes equipped with theatres, restaurants, meeting rooms and dance halls arose. One of Harlem’s most famous, the Renaissance Casino, provided the backdrop for the area’s most elegant dances and exciting sporting ... Harlem Casino, 1889, Harlem. Posted on 02/22/2012 by — Leave a reply. This is the Harlem Casino. Some have said it was the oldest theatrical building left in Manhattan. After that initial laying of the cornerstone on June 11th 1889, everything went wrong for what was going to be the West End Theatre. The theater’s owner and backer ran out of money soon after the cornerstone was laid and ... Harlem Casino (New York, N.Y.) Title ; Close. Social Networks and Archival Context. SNAC is a discovery service for persons, families, and organizations found within archival collections at cultural heritage institutions. Sponsors. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation ... Harlem VFW details page: This casino can be found in Harlem, Montana. Harlem VFW has a total of 5 slot machines for your entertainment. WCD also books hotel rooms in the major casino resorts in Harlem. You will also find images of Harlem VFW or see the latest news headlines about Harlem VFW on our site. We also have a forum just for Harlem VFW. Largest Casinos in Harlem. The largest casino in Harlem, Montana according to gaming machines and table games put together, is Kennedy's Bar. It has 8 gaming machines and 0 tables games. You can contact the Kennedy's Bar at +1 406-353-2742 . The Kennedy's Bar is located at Main Street Lofts, 66 Main Street, Yonkers, NY 10701, USA. The Renaissance Theater & Casino was a true center for the African-American community. Built in 1921 and owned and operated by African-American entrepreneurs, it housed a 900-seat theater, casino ... Download this stock image: At the Heumann Harlem Casino beginning Saturday, May 4th, Svedrofsky and his orchestra from the Metropolitan Opera House, every evening. Date c1907. - ER6TKN from Alamy's library of millions of high resolution stock photos, illustrations and vectors. MLA Format. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, The New York Public Library. "Harlem Casino" The New York Public Library Digital Collections.1904. Trouvez les Harlem Casino images et les photos d’actualités parfaites sur Getty Images. Choisissez parmi des contenus premium Harlem Casino de la plus haute qualité.

[index] [13034] [28184] [9456] [10949] [11833] [19448] [10200] [33917] [9807] [21894]

HARLEM SHAKE - CASINO DE ST BREVIN L'OCEAN

2/23/19 2nd Annual Harlem Nights Casino Night. Raleigh, NC How would you react when winning BIG? In the land of regular jackpots and big wins, anything is possible at Thunder Valley. Lucky You! SONG Baauer Harlem sha... Harlem Shake Casino Turlock Poker Room 02-25-13 - Duration: 0:40. Turlock Poker Room 9,970 views. 0:40. Harlem Shake - Fat Gamer Nerd Edition - Duration: 0:31. boogie2988 Recommended for you. 0:31 ... Welcome back everybody hope you have been well! Today we talk about a club that not too many people know about or even have heard about. It's the Club Harlem...

http://bitcoin-casino.forexuse.pw